Aphex twins with others-WARP - Aphex Twin

Aphex Twin is up to something! You can pick out classic Aphex Twin tracks by just reading off any of his release tracklists. But away from his main project, the artist born Richard David James has made mind-blowing music under a whole host of different names. Check out some of our favourites below. The Caustic Window LP was originally planned for release in but canned after just five test pressings were produced.

Aphex twins with others

Judi Dench - every film - ranked! I just cherry Aphex twins with others the best bits which at that time I thought were good. Written by Aphex twins with others Harrison 11 September. Apnex Commons has media related to Aphex Twin. You think with your language so your language Inuyasha sees kagome bath how you think. Which is fine sometimes, y'know? Oh I'm always taking the piss out of everyone. About halfway through the track's video, a multitude of Aphex Faces manifest in the primordial sludge, appearing to emerge from mud. The sleeve of the album Richard D James sees the Aphex Face in close relief — a leering grin and wild, staring eyes. I made all my stuff onto cassette wih the 90s.

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Favourite Artists by sosice. Archived from the original on 30 September Archived from the original on 1 May Aphex twins with others from the original on 5 August I want all the early stuff on tape, but not for the prices it goes for! A-F-X TwinA. Retrieved 20 January I guess you can othsrs it up to timing. That was the buzz for me [ Favorite Artist by flodder.

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  • Raised in Cornwall , James began releasing records in the early s under aliases such as AFX and Polygon Window , and co-founded the independent label Rephlex Records in
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For Richard D. James a. But it was also a return to Funkhaus. Rewind back to A young Richard D. James visited Funkhaus for the first—and probably the last—time. The former GDR broadcasting center was still active, and RDJ and his tour manager were waiting to be interviewed by Marusha on her notorious Dancehall radio show on the now defunct former east German youth program DT64 to promote his set at Tresor , which was then a still somewhat new Berlin club at the time.

Video games were played, jokes were cracked and the general atmosphere was rather understated. That anecdote was spinning in my head when I arrived at Funkhaus around 8 PM. Did he remember that interview or the show at Tresor? It was, in fact, a hybrid set. It was one of the last tracks played by Klasse Wrecks label boss Luca Lozano during his opening set.

By then the volume had increased, but for all the stacks of speakers that were hanging all over the place, it still sounded quite reserved. The change in energy could be felt when the first wave of amen breaks washed over the crowd. Paradox took to the mic throughout his set to crack jokes and announce track names. Surprisingly, the intricate drum programming and bare bones sound that I typically love in a DJ set felt a bit exhausting to me at times. Nevertheless, halfway through, you could see parts of the dance floor moving for the first time of the night.

Then it was time for Aphex Twin. He began with a drawn-out intro that mixed ambient soundscapes, samples from old movies and various bleeps. Did they have technical difficulties? And just before all the nervous anticipation could turn into impatience, Aphex Twin started his set for real. It was time to rave.

From there he ploughed through fast-paced techno, acid squelches, breakbeats and power electronics. He changed genre and tempo every few minutes—his shifts matched by intense strobing and laser array buckshot.

For his visuals he used his now trademark face mapping technology to create wildly disorienting effects. Halfway through his set, he went from bpm to bpm industrial strength hardcore techno in the span of mere minutes. Heavy distorted kicks merged with full-speed drum and bass. James had shifted Shedhalle into full-on rave mode. Unsurprisingly, when the music stopped, the place erupted.

As expected, it felt like a challenge to follow after this minute rollercoaster ride. Parts of the audience moved out into the cold. Judging by the faces of the people I saw, there was an equal amount of bliss and confusion about what had just happened. A little later a friend of mine ecstatically said something about having just witnessed the essence of rave, while another seemed bewildered.

They were having a hard time digesting what they had just experienced. I felt happily worn out. Richard D.

I get credited for so many things, it's incredible. Favorite Artists by dclippard. Richard D. Expert Knob Twiddlers. Artists by underboobs.

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Richard James performing in Turin in I just think it's really funny to have terms like that. It's basically saying, "this is intelligent and everything else is stupid. I don't use names. I just say that I like something or I don't. I did it because the thing in techno you weren't supposed to do was to be recognized and stuff.

The sort of unwritten rule was that you can't put your face on the sleeve. It has to be like a circuit board or something. Therefore I put my face on the sleeve. That's why I originally did it. But then I got carried away. Best Special Effects. Best Video.

Aphex Twin’s Entire Discography Can Now Be Streamed For Free Online

Information Jobs Advertising Terms of service. Nobody can chew up music and spit it back out quite like Richard D. Throughout the 90s, the Cornwall-bred prankster refracted practically every known sub-genre of electronic music through the kaleidoscope of his whimsical personality and extreme technical ambitions. With each album from the artist, best known as Aphex Twin, came a new, warped blueprint.

Selected Ambient Works brought new lush melodic instincts to dance music, while its sequel, Selected Ambient Works Vol. II , cut the drums entirely and turned its titular genre cavernous. The early internet buzzed with rumours of him ambushing audiences with noise by playing pieces of sandpaper instead of records in his DJ sets, riding around in a fully armed tank, building vast secret studios of custom home brew synthesisers and stockpiling hundreds, if not thousands, of unreleased tracks.

He often came off as aloof or purposely oblique in interviews. James doubled down on this position around the turn of the century, when he all but disappeared from music entirely. In he released Drukqs , a sprawling and critically misunderstood double disc collection that alternated between information-overloaded rhythmic assaults and sombre treated piano numbers.

For a while it seemed like it would be James' swan song. James retreated from the public eye, moved to Scotland, got married, had children and simply left the myths to simmer.

It wasn't until that he re-emerged with Syro , his sixth album under the Aphex Twin moniker, and did the last thing anyone would expect — he opened up. There were no tanks and no sandpaper in the press run that followed. Instead he just talked enthusiastically about his family life, his recording process and even his once-guarded list of studio equipment.

After years of hiding behind the frozen, grinning visage of his own face that was once his visual trademark, he had finally removed the mask. James acknowledges the significance of this reverse heel turn, but he claims it came with little conscious effort.

Over the first few months of he dropped free and previously unreleased tracks into an anonymous SoundCloud account. If the suits are getting annoyed then it's definitely a good idea. In the years since, James has comfortably resumed his position as an active institutional hero of experimental electronic music. His occasional festival DJ sets have become major events in the dance music world, and he continues to release music at a steady clip, eschewing the album format in favour of short-form EPs.

It [was] like putting water on the flames. Then I thought after that I'll put out some fucking banging stuff. When I spoke to James, he was seemingly still operating in the spirit of openness — waxing philosophical about teleportation, online dating and waking up in the middle of the night with an itching desire to spend too much money on rare electro records. AN: How are you doing today? RDJ: Pretty good, actually. Just sitting outside in the last bit of summer sun. It's quite warm, it's nice I'm not really used to doing interviews on the phone.

But I'm being a good boy, I'm doing what I'm told. What sparked that? Did you just wake up one day like "I'm tired of taking the piss"? Oh I'm always taking the piss out of everyone. It's essential. I don't know really. I have a terrible memory. The only interesting thing I can say is about doing the SoundCloud thing, dumping loads of tracks on there — I've got all this music and I thought if I died what the fuck would my kids do? What would my wife do?

They'd get really stressed out and they wouldn't know what to do with it all. So I just thought I'd give it away, then they don't have to think about it. I think you were the first and maybe still are the only established artist from the pre-internet era to fully embrace that kind of freedom in online distribution. It's very different for old fuckers like me to understand what's going on with the internet now but I think I've got a handle.

I mean I've always been into technology and computers but it still totally freaks me out. You've uploaded the track, it's only been there for a minute and a thousand people have listened to it! The track's five minutes long and they're already commenting on it after one minute. You're getting feedback before they've even listened to the track. It's brilliant in some ways but also quite scary. But at the same time it must have been liberating to have two decades of work suddenly open up to the world.

Oh it was amazing. The thing is I haven't even started. Not long after I did that I found I made all my stuff onto cassette before the 90s. Then when I got a DAT machine that was the first time you could actually back something up. If you made tracks in the 80s there was no way to duplicate them [in high quality].

You could put them on a cassette but it would always sound shit, even if you had the best equipment in the world. I used to lose sleep when I was a teenager like "shit I've lost the tapes. And when you listen to your music — which is the best thing about making music, you can listen to it — each time you play it it's getting worse and worse.

Bits of tape are falling off while you're listening to it. Then for the next 20 years I just listened to all those DATs and put all the cassettes away, back in their boxes. I forgot that of course I didn't back all of it up, I was young, I didn't have the patience to sit through a C90 [90 minute] cassette and put the whole lot in. I just cherry picked the best bits which at that time I thought were good. Basically I just forgot that there's all this other stuff.

Which is fucking amazing for me! It's like the best gift I've ever given myself, being able to listen to tracks that you've completely forgotten about.

That's the ultimate thing for me. If somebody would say you can have anything in the universe — you can have teleportation, you can be invisible, you can do time travel, whatever, my first [wish] would be to listen to my tracks.

Either ones I've forgotten about or ones I've lost or things from the future that I haven't done [yet]. So to discover those cassettes, it's better than teleportation for me. I wanted to ask about what I see as kind of the opposite of the SoundCloud thing, these limited 12"s and tapes that you've been exclusively releasing at certain shows. What's the thinking behind those? Well I was trying to get people in the concert for free. I'm getting paid quite a lot of money for doing these gigs and then the ticket prices go up.

I was feeling a bit guilty about that so I thought if people are really bothered and they get there early they can pick up some limited stuff for the gig and then they can make money [back by reselling it]. It's a pretty flawed philosophy but it does make sense to a certain degree. I mean But then it's not that bad really is it because they can just get the mp3s or whatever.

They'll get it eventually, they just won't possess it. Are you the type of collector who hears a track and needs to possess a physical copy? I'm really bad and because I've made money now and I pay ridiculous amounts.

I bought this thing called Truth , it's a 90s techno thing, has a blue label, it's a lovely record, I've played it out in some sets It's crazy.

I think it was about 15 years ago when Discogs first kicked off and me and my friends used to be looking at all these amazing electro records and we're like "man this is expensive, they're like pounds, fuckin' hell. I spent like 10 grand on fucking electro records. But all those records now are between and quid. It's just nice knowing that if I had waited any longer I never would've gotten them. I learned a lesson when I was a kid. We were in Cornwall and he had been up to London and bought two copies of it.

There was no way I could get that record because I'd have to go to London, there was no internet back then, and then he said I'll sell it to you for 30 quid. I remember giving it to him and he gave me the record and he looked at me like "you're such an idiot" for paying that much.

I was like "yeah but I've got this amazing record and you've just got pieces of paper in your hand. What role has your family played in your music in recent years? The same as it's ever been. I always incorporate the sounds of whoever's around me into whatever I do. I don't try to do it, they're just around me when I'm making music.

Whoever's around me gets put into it. I sample my mum and dad loads, they're still around. It's quite a weird thought but I just sample their voices over a long range so when they die I can still make music with their voices.

But it's interesting as well with family. I don't know if you know about formants in the voice structure.

Aphex twins with others

Aphex twins with others