Coditioning feed for cock fighting-What to feed when conditioning

Remember Me? What to feed when conditioning Hey everyone i used to go cockfighting with my dad here in hawaii before and i stopped because i moved to a different island i wanted to know what do you feed the roosters when you are conditioning them for a fight i use to see my dad mixing different things in the feed when he was conditioning his roosters for a fight he recently passed away and left alot of roosters im planning to get back into cockfighting any information about my question would be really helpful Thanks in advance to everyone. Re: What to feed when conditioning Well i don't know where you live but from reading your post it looks like your from Hawaii and I'm pretty sure that cockfighting is illegal in Hawaii. If you would like to know what people used to feed their cocks back when it was legal to prepare them, I am sure that someone would be happy to tell you. Reason: forgot few words.

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Sparring 3 x a week for 2 months long released approximately 3 meters short released approximately 1 meter 3. Any cock that Coditioning feed for cock fighting get on his back shall be righted again by the pitter, Erotic thoughts not taken off the ground Cooditioning is lying on. So why grains? This site was designed with the. Can you tell me about the day I was Jackie guerrido in bikini Accessibility Help. Always handle your birds gently as pos- sible, change straw in coop daily ; allow them to become accustomed to lamp light, if to be fought at night ; keep in a warm, well ventilated place. Oats, not dehulled, is a high in fiber grain, this is used Coditioning feed for cock fighting make the gamefowl lighter, given at 10 to 30 percent. Try stepping on it lightly and if it sticks to your shoe, then it has the right moisture.

Girl skirt driving. Crude Protein

Jefferson Panlilio December 2, at AM. I prefer it to bread and sweet milk for such ffighting, but if you can't get black-strap molasses, give the Kharma boobs a good big feed of bread and sweet milk that first morning he is in the fly pen but nothing at night. During these first two weeks it would be fine to give him the white of a hard boiled egg occasionally, about one to every three cocks. Soaking the grains will eliminate the hazardous materials such as toxins and phytic acid. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom. Grains: Corn fightinv the highest energy and the best grain for Coditioning feed for cock fighting. These can ruin everything in just a few minutes. If you use straw or hay, put in fresh litter every keep or so. So his good idea never fughting acceptance. But don't continue it beyond the point where he is enjoying and enthusiastic about the Super lube canada. The entire session will not take over half a minute. Re: The best conditioning method Purebreed8. No fighging or hesitation between rounds. Use once a day for the last week or ten days Do the same with Coditioning feed for cock fighting liver oil at the other daily feeding.

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This article will show the principles of feeding in the conditioned battlecocks. Feeds are the primarily source of energy and nutrition thus a major contributor of the gamefowl performance.

Ultimately this article will guide you how you make and apply your feeds to the amazing pitfighters. On the basic aproach, protein makes and repair the muscle of the gamefowl. The feed must have a crude protein of 17 to 19 percent for the properly preconned gamecocks.

Regarding the feed, different localities have different available resources, so adjust accordingly. The thing is this grain can make your gamefowls heavy when given in a large amount, as this energy will be converted to fats if not used.

We use this 10 to 30 percent, defending on the fats of the individual roosters. Wheat is one of the key to develop breast muscle. Must be given soaked at least, better if feremented. But only use this in 10percent amount as this would likely make them heavy because of the water. Oats, not dehulled, is a high in fiber grain, this is used to make the gamefowl lighter, given at 10 to 30 percent. In the coditioining We give it 10percent. Why mixed already? The main reason they formulate this feed is to make ample source of different nutrients needed as possible.

So why grains? Mixed grains may have 14 to 18 percent crude protein and comes with vitamins and minerals that helps for a generally healthier gamefowl, but may not be enough or still lack of energy needed for power and endurance. Conditioning Pellets are made to add the other nutrition that the grains are lacking for the conditioning activities.

Conditioning Pellets are formulated with a higher crude protein 20 to 22 percent , portified with higher calcium and other vitamins and minerals to raise the amounts to at least the minimum level needed by the gamefowls in the conditioning period.

It is common that conditioning pellets come with Phytic Acid Neutralizer PAN to prevent the negative effect of phytic acid on muscle contraction. Animal proteins are supplemented to the gamefowls to raise the protein of the diet. Also adds vitamins and minerals available on the particular animal protein. You must give them some protein supplements because of their activities in the conditioning process.

In order to accomplish this you need to supplement them with animal proteins. As animal protein have lots of amino acid essential on creating muscle tissues compared to the plant source counterpart. Creates a lean muscle as it is cholesterol and fat-free. But the main use of eggwhite is to add and balance moisture to the feed. It is because eggwhite ,may be high in crude protein but, contains only few amino acids.

Eggwhite must be cooked or at least somehow treated with heat, this will resolve the anti nutrient problem on the egg-white, if given raw egg white is useless. Beef has a higher crude protein than eggwhite and pork. And contains many amino acids, specially what the gamefowl needed comes the first few buckles Phosphagen System.

Beef liver is best in the precon and conditioning while beef is best on the last few days before the fight. Many use powder milk or fresh milk without knowing this but the thing is this milk gives the chickens moisture and this is the only benefit of their milk.

You could ferment the fresh milk, to breakdown the lactose into simplier form and may be assimilated by the game fowl. Remember this is now a bit acidic unlike the raw milk, so remove other acidic supplement that you may be adding.

These could give rarely gastro intestinal discomfort until the chicken can tolerate it. If on tight budget, like the common farmers in the mountain that askeds us what to replace the beef, we advise to look for available protein sources like frogs, hornet or wasp larvae. With this simple addition to their feeds, they win significantly higher than their opponents on their humble competion tupada on the high lands :. Soaking the grains will eliminate the hazardous materials such as toxins and phytic acid.

Phytic acid will make the muscle contraction lesser resulting to a poor power and extension. And soaking will significantly decrease, if not eliminate, the phytic acid. Regularly we soak it 7 to 12 hours, soaked at 7:am and drained and washed at pm, then soak new batch at pm and drained and washed at 7:am the next day. And the activity of soaking continues. Fermenting is soaking the grains for at least 48 hours with an effective organism, lactic acid bacteria solution or beneficial indiginous microorganism.

This is the best procedure for grains for feeding conditioned gamefowls. This will result to a healthier gamefowl and contributes greatly to a great performance. Germinating the grains, the process is soaking the grains for 7 to 12 hours and transferred to a dark area in a draining container, covered with towel or newspaper and let to sprout for 24 to 36 hours. This is the best feeding procedure for grains for feeding gamefowls except conditioned ones and chicks.

Take note germination make the crude protein a bit less than the dry, soak and fermented counterpart. When soaking, fermenting and germinating is forgotten the grain could be cooked and let to be boiled for some time. Gamefowls usually wont eat dry grains completely if used to the soak ones. And also the possibility of upsetting the digestion will be minimized.

These grits are somehow like the teeth of the bird in the gizzard to grind the feed especially the grains and other hard stuffs. We put a feeding cup filled with grits so the gamecocks can have them anytime they want to.

The reason we put it in the cups is it will be removed it in the last 5 days of the keep. This liquid or powder supplements comes with variety of vitamins and minerals and other additional components that is helpful for the gamefowls in training and fight day. The usual amount is 40g to 45g totally with the supplements excluding the meat supplement. You must know how much they individually need in every given time.

Including that those that do not came in the right pre conditioning process give them 30 to 60 grams according to what they need, and according to the response of their body. Collaborated and united to form their best and optimized standard principles and methodologies regarding current and future gamefowl arts and disciplines. Your email address will not be published. Conditioning Feeds and Feeding. Gamefowl Conditioning Feed Guide This article will show the principles of feeding in the conditioned battlecocks.

Crude Protein On the basic aproach, protein makes and repair the muscle of the gamefowl. The Feed Composition Ingredients Regarding the feed, different localities have different available resources, so adjust accordingly.

Grains: Corn contains the highest energy and the best grain for carboloading. Wheat Wheat is one of the key to develop breast muscle.

Jockey oats Oats, not dehulled, is a high in fiber grain, this is used to make the gamefowl lighter, given at 10 to 30 percent. Mixed grains consisted of tapilans, lupins, peas, wheat, oat groats, jockey oats, safflower, barley, corn, some may have beans and other seeds. Animal Proteins Animal proteins are supplemented to the gamefowls to raise the protein of the diet.

Eggwhite Creates a lean muscle as it is cholesterol and fat-free. Beef Beef has a higher crude protein than eggwhite and pork. Others If on tight budget, like the common farmers in the mountain that askeds us what to replace the beef, we advise to look for available protein sources like frogs, hornet or wasp larvae.

Feed Processing Soaking Soaking the grains will eliminate the hazardous materials such as toxins and phytic acid. Fermenting Fermenting is soaking the grains for at least 48 hours with an effective organism, lactic acid bacteria solution or beneficial indiginous microorganism. Germination Germinating the grains, the process is soaking the grains for 7 to 12 hours and transferred to a dark area in a draining container, covered with towel or newspaper and let to sprout for 24 to 36 hours.

Cooking When soaking, fermenting and germinating is forgotten the grain could be cooked and let to be boiled for some time. Beef and eggwhite should be cooked. Beef could be cooked rare and eggs should be hardboiled. Grits grits is very essential as they are the key to grinding the feed to be digested by the gamefowls. Conditioning feed Conditioning feed- this is different from pointing feed. Mixing Procedure Rinse the soaked grains. Drain the grains.

Prepare the mixing bowl Chop the eggwhite to pecksize Add the grains to the mixing bowl Add the beef, eggwhite, milk and other supplements Mix the components in the bowl Add the conditioning pellets last. Continued on Pointing Feed References U. Department of Agriculture Nutrient Database www. About The Total Gamefowl. Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your email address will not be published.

Whatever the cause, try to eliminate it. He possibly could help you, but probably not, for he can not know all you have done or failed to do. Originally Posted by purebreed8. He always enjoys changes. It's his now. Keep droppings medium loose all during keep, even on fight day.

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting

Coditioning feed for cock fighting. Gamefowl Conditioning Feed Guide

This helps develop their reflexes and good fighting skills. Sparring will help them learn and develop various fighting techniques and make them clever fighters. This will help them build strength and power in their wings. By using a teaser rooster, we train them to be alert all the time. After this, wash their feet and faces and place them again at their teepees for them to have enough rest and be ready for the next morning work-out again.

Labels: bakbakan , bantay-sabong , gamefowl , sabong , sabong. To feed accurately you need a feed cup which has a flat top so that you know exactly how much you are feeding. A whiskey higger is okay or one those little plastic measures which come in coffee cans.

The important thing is for you to know exactly how much you are feeding. Every one-fourth ounce makes a difference. Measuring by a spoon or a handful is no good. Not accurate enough. Find out exactly how much your measure holds by weighing its contents of your dry grain mix on the scales and then feed a little or a little less than a cupful. But the important thing is for you to know how much you are feeding and not be guessing at it.

After that, note how each individual cock reponds to his feed, as indicated by his appetite and his weight, and measure his feed accordingly. It is far better to feed too little than too much. You'll only make him sluggish and upset. Keeping in mind that the purpose of any keep is tohave a cock 1 fresh 2 alert 3 active 4 confident and 5 happy.

If anything in this keep or any other one interferes with those objectives, abandon the practices or the feed which you think is causing the trouble and do something else. No set schedule or formula will cover all conditions of weather, state of health and flesh, temperament of cocks, etc. You must appraise all these things as you go along by observing the cocks and noting their responses to what you are feeding or what you are doing to them.

I'm a great believer in changing the cock's location frequently during the keep. Coops on green grass one day, fly-pen another, regular small pen with dirt or sand bottom the next, etc. Such changes keep them fresh and eager. Whenever the weather is favorable, I like to keep them outdoors during the daytime.

I'm not afraid of getting them "loose" on fresh grass provided they have been on grass prior to entering the keep. It keeps them fresh. You wouldn't like to be shut up in a close, hot stall and neither do they. It's the same on cold or windy or rainy days.

Don't be a slave to a schedule. Keep water in front of them all the time until the last 24 or 48 hours before fight time, then give them less depending upon the weather. I do like to keep them quiet and resting the last three days or 72 hours prior to their fight, but use judgement on this too and by all means have them comfortable and happy.

What you feed, how much you feed , when and how you exercise the cocks will vary somewhat with every bunch you put up. Just keep in mind what you are trying to accomplish, as stated previously, by observing the reaction of the fowl to what you are feeding and doing, and dont be a robot to this or any other system. During the entire keep, notice the droppings every day. They should be firm but soft.

Not hard and dried up, but not watery either. If they are either, try to determine the cause and correct it. They are a sure sign of a cock's condition and his ability to assimilate his food. He will not prosper if his droppings are not right. Sometimes it is the feed that is the trouble. Other times it is caused by nervousness or environment. Whatever the cause, try to eliminate it. No matter what feed or other procedure you are following, your fowl will be going down hill instead of improving if his droppings are off.

One good conditioner i knew was called a "bowel man. So pay attention to them. They are important. Toward the end of the keep the droppings should firm up somewhat due to the character of the feed and less water.

Regulate both to bachieve the result. You will have to work that out for yourself. No formula can anticipate all the conditions which you will encounter during the keep. The use of scales during the keep is important. Weigh each morning before the cock has been fed and when he has been without water all night.

Record such weight day by day on a chart right to the quarter ounce so you can determine whether a cock is gaining or losing weight which is a excellent indication of his health, and whether or not he is prospering on the quality and quantity of feed he is recieving.

A cock should be at about his proper fighting weight when he enters the keep following a week or two of the preconditioning process.

Make such increases and decreases in weight gradually. I he does not change, don't fret about it. Such uniformity in weight indicates that a cock is jus about right in weight, and you should not attempt to change it. By all means concentrate on having a cock "coming up" in weight, health, spirit, , and freshness as the day of battle approaches. Note especially Spirit and Freshness.

Many good cockers make their selections on the day of the fight based largely on a cock's freshness and eagerness on fight day regardless of how he has shown in his previous sparring sessions. I am a great believer in freshness and in having lots of moisture in a cocks tissues when fought.

One excellent cocker I know who has a splendid record for setting down cutting cocks attributes much of his success to having cocks with a lot of moisture in their muscles.

He actually forces in the moisture by feeding aloof oatmeal soaked in buttermilk, and alot od stale bread soaked in water. Personally, I think he overdoes this feature of feeding, but you can't argue with success. My own fowl have a splendid reputation for cutting, and I always have plenty of moisture in their systems. Certain it is that a cock will hit short and not "reach out" with his blows.

The matter of a cock's proper fighting weight is a topic of dispute among even the best conditioners. Both win and apparently show equally strong and durable fowl. You don't want any gut fat in them. That's sure. But other than that you'll have to come to your own decision as to your fowl's proper fighting weight basd upon your experience and observations. In any event, approach this problem with an open mind and don't be a slave to the scales or preconceived ideas.

Base your judgement on what you observe with your own fowl. It is no good to have them "ready" or at their peak, two days or even two hours prior to battle.

They must "peak" at the hour they enter the pit. Many features contribute to this condition, but from a feeding standpoint the important part is to have them "comin up" just prior to battle, and fresh. Not over one-half the feed the eveing before fight day unless fought at night and then only one-half white of hard boiled egg. Through this procedure, cocks will come up in weight, even on less feed, and be hungry and " a walkin' and talkin' in your hands" as they enter the pit.

Some conditioners endeavor to control this timing, or peaking, through the use of various drugs. Black Magic 4oz. Use all during the keep. You have up a show of 12 birds from which you must show eight. Which ones should you use? In this respect, I always think of the advice given me by Elmer Ehrhart of York, Pennsylvania, over thirty years ago. He said : "Take only your Aces to the pit. Leave the Kings and Queens at home.

We put a second rate bird in the keep, but he improves and we "talk ourselves" into believing that he can win. But he doesn't. So beware of "talking yourself" into a win. Rather follow the advice of old Elmer: "Take only the Aces to the pit.

The chances are that they willmeet someone else's Ace and you will have a zero on the scoreboard. Just as important as the feed and exercise parts. By means of feed and bench work you can't improve a cock's hpysical strength a great deal, but by proper taming you can improve his readiness for battle 1, percent.

Look at it this way: You bring a cock which has been accustomed to quiet surroundings and familiar people into a strange place, slap a set of heels on him, then take him to a brilliantly lighted arena with a different sort of pit surface, and a mob of strangers raising a racket like a boiler factory and expect him to ignore all these strange sitghts and sounds and turn in a superb exhibition of fighting.

Under similar circumstances great opera singers have been known to become distraught and they could not utter a sound. Gamecocks react the same way. Especially the high-strung ones which have been all keyed up anyway. I've see high-class cocks so confused by all the noise, lights, and commotion that they would not even leave their scores, and were killed before they lifted a foot. Cocks can become accustomed to airplanes passing overhead or a barking dog racing along the fence, but it takes some time and it's up to you to get them aquainted with such surroundings.

Here's how: Start in early when you first select your show four weeks before fight day, and as you pass his coop, drop in a little piece of white bread about the size of a dime. In a few days he will be looking for the bread and learn that when you stop by his coop that you are not going to harm him but rather that you have something for him which he likes.

You have made a good start. If he doesn't , don't insist, but drop the bread gently before him and move on. He will tame down in time. Whyen you have to catch the cock to move him from one pklace to another do so very gently.

Take your time. Avoid getting him excited or making him wild. If he goes to ramming or flying around, leave him alone for a while and let him settle down. Then, when you get him in hand, pet him and rub him slowly and gently for a minute or so before placing him in his new quarters. When you do set him down, do it slowly and gently.

Don't heave him into his new coop. Let him know that you are not going to hurt him, that he can have cinfidence in you. Offer him a bite of apple while you have him in hand, if he accepts it, so much the better. Everything there is new to him. Take it slow and easy. Place him gently on the work bench, let him look around and get aquainted with the place for 25 seconds, keeping your hands on him gently all the time. Then, when he gets ready to walk around, as he will in a few seconds, walk around with him very slowly and gently.

He may even eastsome of the "goodies" you have placed there for him. But keep your hands on him gently all the time, and make no quick or fast moves. After a minute or so, lift him gently off the board, rub him for a few seconds, and then carefully ease him into his cock stall, releasing him slowly, and quietly close the door. I've gone into this with much detail which sounds like kindergarten stuff, yet I know countless men who have been conditioning roosters for 60 years who to this moment have their twice a day "go-around" with the cocks in their care.

They never fail to remark when they visit me how tame my birds are and what a tussle they have with theirs. My birds aren't tame. It's all a matter of how you handle them, and particular, how you start in. The first few times you taka a cock out of a conditioning stall is another critical time. Do this very quietly and very gently.

By all means avoid getting him "het up" and flouncing around in there. Better to leave him in there than to get him all excited and fighting you. Sometimes you can divert his attention with feed in his cup so that you can get your hands on him gently without raising a fuss.

Once in hand remove him slowly from the cock stall, pet him for a few seconds, then put him on the work bench where the "goodies" are, and walk him around for a while as you did the first time. Don't attempt to "work" him those first few trips.

Rather, concentrate on having him aquainted with the place and liking it there. Another dandy tidbit to put on the work bench for taming a cock are little pieces of unsalted butter about the size of a pea. They love it; dance and jumparound calling the hens annd forgewt all about you and being afraid. While he is in that mood, take your hands off him and back away a step or two so that he owns the work bench himself.

It's his now. Then slowly approach him with your hands down rather than extended as if to catch him and when you get alongside him, slowly and gently put your hands back on him, move him around a little, pick him up, pet him a few times, and carefully return to his stall. All this seems like an awful lot of detail and actually takes longer to read than to do it, but if done right the first few times it pays big dividends, and saves a tremendous amount of time for all the remainder of the keep, to say nothing of avoiding countless scratches and bruises to yourself.

In a couple of days you should be able to open the cock stall door and have the cock come out to you by himself, fly to the work bench, crow and strut around without your laying a hand on him. That's when you'll be glad you spent all that care with him at the beginning. Now you can work him with pleasure instead of engaging in a "free for all" twice a day. That same relationship carries over when you move him from pen to pen. He will be right at the door waiting for you to pick him up and carry him to new quarters.

He always enjoys changes. After a few days of this and the cock is thoroughly at home in the cock house and thinks the place is his, it's time to introduce him to noise and confusion.

The best thing I know for this is a portable radio. Turn it to some station which carries on a continuous program of news, music and weather, turn it up full blast and let him listen to Rock 'n Roll, tom toms and all the rest of the noises including human shouting until he becomes as sick and accustomed to it as you are. Sports events are especially good with all the shouting.

Also make plenty of noise while you are in the cockhouse. Drop pans or buckets on the floor. Get him use to them and teach him they will not harm him. Let people come to the cock house and blab away while you're working the birds. Let him get use to them. He will encounter plenty of noise and confusion at the pit, so let him get use to them ahead of time. If a cock will be fought under electric lights, by all means work him on the training table under electric lights so that he will become accustomed to them.

Likewise, if he is to fight at night, spar him at night and have the pit floor as nearly as possible like the pit floor where he will fight. Bring the radio to the sparring pit and have it blaring away as loud as you can while the sparring is going on. I have a couple of little 3x2x2 portable, collapsible scratch pens which I take with me on multi-day meets. These are setup with some shucks or straw for litter in or about the cock house.

After the cock has been worked I placed him in there for three minutes while I work the next cock. Throw a few grains of feed in there and he makes the straw fly. Placing him in there and taking him out also adds to the taming. Do it slowly, and gently so as to build up confidence between you and him.

Many times I've carried the birds on a long night haul, and when they arrived at their destination were a bit squeamish with the new quarters. But, five minutes in the familiar scratch coops and everything was alright again. They owned the place. That's the attitude you want to develope. All these little things help to obtain it. When heeling the cocks I greatly prefer to do the holding and to let someone else tie on the heels. The cock does not understand this. So I'll do the holding myself. The cock is used to me and my hands, so he is relaxed and comfortable and everything is fine.

It's the same way with handling. By no stretch of the imagination am I an expert handler, but the cock knows me and is used to my way of handling him. If you or the man who put up the birds are not going to handle, at least have whoever has done the conditioning bring him into the pit, weigh him, walk him around while he becomes accustomed to the surroundings and then pass him to the handler just before the start of the battle. So that is about all I can think to tell about taming a cock.

It is your duty as a conditioner to aquaint him with those conditions ahead of time. Don't condemn him as a dunce because he just stands there and gets killed in his bewilderment. Call yourself a dunce for not aquainting with such conditions in advance.

That's what I've called myself, and worse names, many times. Working or Exercising I was brought up on the " runs flies" practice of working a cock in order to strengthen his muscles, improve his wind, enable him to fight longer, and make him harder to kill. Such exercises may improve all of those desirable traits to a limited extent, but of one thing I am certain; they surely take the cut out of him! And I would rather have cutting ability than all those others combined.

I don't care how tough and strong a cock is, he can't take many shots to the lungs or underneath the wings, and keep going. And that's were a real cutting cock is going to pop him. Accordingly, long ago I abandoned the old heavy bench work practices, and concentrated on keeping a cock fresh, loose, alert , and confident wherever he is, especially in the pit which I want him to consider his own domain.

That is the principal or basis of this keep. So have it constantly in mind. It all is designed to promote cutting and confidence. Likewise it is my belief that a cock hits as much with his heart as he does with his feet and legs. With this statement of objectives set forth, let's get going to the practices. You will need certain facilities and equipment. I like to use peat moss in the stalls. It's sort of dusty, but the cocks wont eat it, it's soft on their feet and bodies, they soon find that there's nothing to eat in there, and consequently remain quiet and are not scratching around all day, and it's very absorbant of moisture.

This latter is important, especially where you are shifting cocks from the outside to the inside frequently. Nothing is so dangerous for developing rattles as moisture in the cock house, and peat moss helps to protect against the hazard. As many as the number of cocks you plan to put up at one time.

Just don't overdo it like so many cockers do. Two days at a time for a total of 12 days over a period of three weeks should be enough. Little or non the last week. Dirt is too dusty and I don't like boards or concrete. The fly pens should be covered, if outside, with only the front open. For litter use corn shucks if you can get them. If not, use clean bright straw or hay. If you use straw or hay, put in fresh litter every keep or so.

Cocks like to scratch in clean bright stuff. Don't put the litter in too deep. You don't want to stiffen the fowl by too strenuous scratching. Sometimes I put a couple of hens in each pen for a day or so ahead of time to clean out the grain in the litter.

If you can get alfalfa hay, that's fine. Throw in a small chunk of it from time to time. Not every day. The cocks will tear it up in great shape and probably eat some of it which is good for them. For roosts I like swinging perches alternating front and back. Keep the front covered high enough up so that the cocks can't see outside when on the floor. Have a few hens running loose outside.

The cocks want to "watch the girls go by," but don't let them "stand on the corner" to do it. Make them fly up to their perches to enjoy the sights.

Smaller is just as good. No doubt you already have them. Put a few inches of washed gravel in there. No litter. You don't want the cocks to be scratching while in them. We will call these sand coops for identification. We will call them grass coops. I prefer to use coops on grass instead of tie cords. These are cooling off pens. Place a cock in there for two or three minutes after you have worked him so he can scratch around while you are working the next bird.

Then, return to his cock house stall for feeding. Now that you have the equipment all set, let's get on with it's use. It is natural voluntary exercise which will not stiffen the muscles if not overdone. Start in four weeks prior to fight date. Do not feed the cock in the evening prior to placing him in the fly pen. Instead, give him a worm pill while he is empty, and a good delousing.

Then, place him in the fly pen for the night. It is a good thing to remove him from his regular coop at night in order not to excite him by catching him in the daytime. The following dy don't feed him anything either morning or night. Instead, mix up a drink of black- strap molasses and water, about a half-cup full to a gallon. This black-strap molasses water acts as a tonic and a laxative. I prefer it to bread and sweet milk for such purposes, but if you can't get black-strap molasses, give the cock a good big feed of bread and sweet milk that first morning he is in the fly pen but nothing at night.

By the next morning he should be plenty empty and hungry. Start in then with your regular feeding program as described in the first section. Don,t doctor up your feed at all with any raw eggs or fancy stuff. Just dry grain scattered in the litter. Clean water before him all the time. Also grit and oyster shell. The secret to using fly pens successfully is to keep the cock active, scratching and flying while he is in there. In order to accomplish this is don't leave him there for too long a stretch at a time.

Break it up by removing him to the grass pen or the sand pen about every third day. Likewise, don't overfeed. Hence the feed measuring cup so you will know how much feed he is getting. Keep him hungry and scratching. I like to have the cock in the fly pen about two-thirds of the time for the first two weeks, and on grass if there is any the other third.

If no grass, then in the sand pens. But don't be a slave to any rigid schedule. If a nice warm day comes along after a cold stretch of weather put him outside even if he was just outside the previous day. On the other hand, if on the day he is scheduled to go outside it is raining or snowing or blowing hard, don't put him out were he will be uncomfortable and miserable.

21 Day Conditioning Method | Oat | Maize

This banner text can have markup. Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. Full text of " Complete guide for conidtioning, heeling, and handling the game cock for the pit " See other formats SF Illustrated by Original Etchings. For years I have viewed with disfavor the tendency on the part of practical cockers to withhold Irom the traternity at large the principles and methods employed by them in conditioning, heeling and handling the game cock.

In the past, when it has been so difficult to obtain the necessary instructions in this line, the professional cocker may have been justi- fied in guarding his secrets so zealously, they being his stock in trade, acquired as a result of years ol experier. Nevertheless, I believe it is for the best interest of those concerned in the advance- ment of this sport, that the correct principles be made public, thereby giving to the ama- teur the benefit of the experience of his elders, to the end that he may be relieved of the embarrassment attending the placing of his birds, money, reputation and peace ot mind at the mercy ot some one who has a reputation as a heeler, but whose reliability is questionable.

The mission of this book, therefore, is to give to the possessor the information I have been able to obtain, together with the benefit of many years experience, to the end that anyone who will practice my methods will soon develop the necessary dexterity enab- ling him to become his own heeler and handler.

Trusting that my efforts will meet with the general approval ot the fraternity at large, I am Faithfully yours, George Conderman, M, D. In constructing a pit you should strive to have it at least 10x12 feet and about 18 inches high ; also arrange to have corners "blocked" or cut off, by placing a 10 or 12 inch strip firmly in each corner. Insist upon having it well lighted. Never fight in sawdust, dry earth nor shavings. Tan bark is the only bottoming, unless fresh earth is used.

As lamp light is required room may be darkened accordingly. Insist upon a warm room lor heeling and fighting. Never use a cellar lor a condition place, and prohibit smoking in conditioning apartments. Next trim the feathers around the bottom of the tail called cock leathers, either in a straight or semi-circular line, according to taste ; trim as near alike as possible on each side so as to present a neat appearance. The vent shou'd always be trimmed.

II permissible enough super- fluous feathers may be cut Irom underneath wings and saddle featheis and around bottom ot tail to slightly decrease weight, or if deemed advisable provided a cock is to be fought in warm quariciS. By clasping the leather ol a heel between the thumbs and index fingers of both hands, the heel on a level with your eye and extend- ing from you, by sighting through the socket you will observe that the point ot the right heel will turn to your right and the point of the left heel will turn to your left; in other words, the points of the heels should always point towards the cock's head.

During the time allotted for conditioning, it is essential that cocks be tossed or ftirted in order to develope wind and muscle, also to improve the steadiness of the bird as well as the disposition. It is therefore necessary that you handle your birds as gently as pos- sible ; by so doing you are benefited in the end by noticing that such careful exercise has been the result of careful treatment, and 9 your birds will be cool, gentle and collected throughout their battle.

Cocks should be tossed on a soft blanket or cushion well padded with straw or hair. Throw your birds up about two feet from cushion, in such a manner that they will strike directly on the cushion each time in alighting. This is done by catching the bird with both hands closely around the wings, allowing your hngers to protrude under each wing, but do not clinch or squeeze the bird in the least; throw him in the air about two feet, letting him strike on the cushion; grasp him again gently pnd toss again, re- peating until bird shows signs ot breathing; this will be enough for the first day.

Alter two or three days it is excellent exer- cise to walk a cock back and forward on a long cushion until he regains his breathing alter prolonged flirting. This will enable you to 10 closely observe as to the cock's peculiarities, also being an excellent exercise and relief from the strain and tedious course the bird is undergoing-. Sparring once during con- ditioning is sufficient and should be indulged in about the tenth day, in the evening. Alter sparring examine closely to be sure no injury has been inflicted, bathe and dry birds and retire them for the day.

By drawing the at- tention of the cock you are conditioning to a bird you have in your hands he will fly all over the room alter the bird. In this way he will not only get the best of exercise but will be taught to strike his opponent in any part of the body, not waiting to find the head, which has cost many a cock his life.

Put your birds in condition coops, else- where described and leave without food for twenty-tour hours, but give all the water they will drink, examine carefully to see that they are in good health and feather, see that they are tree from vermin — if not '' tallow " is one of the best exterminators that is not injurious to the birds — wash and dry the legs and feet, clipping ofi the longer feathers around the vent, carefully weigh with empty crop, making a note of each one's weight and also about how much you wish to re- duce.

Occasionally a cock will need to take on a few ounces to be at his best. These points can only be arrived at by experience and good judgment, which will tell you what you should consider proper fighting weight. This should be pressed on the end ot the stump with your thumb and held there for a tew minutes.

For those that are tat give a pill to each, composed of ten grains of cream of tartar mixed in butter. In about an hour feed bread and milk all that they will eat; then flirt or toss a tew times to start physic. In a few hours you may give a little toast moistened with water or milk. In the morning give a few dips of raw egg and feed of wheat. In the evening give cracked corn, flirting twice through the day, about forty tosses each time, giving water twice, about four dips each time. In the morning give a feed of dry " corn bread " made according to receipt elsewhere given.

In the evening feed wheat, exercis- ing the same as previous day. Water twice, about four dips each time. In the morning feed cracked corn. In the evening feed either corn or wheat, giving half ot hard boiled egg to each. Feed same as filth, increasing work to 60 or 65 tosses. In the morning feed pearl barley and give barley water to drink. At noon feed a little lean beef, chopped fine. Work twice, in- creasing work to at least 75 tosses. In the evening give half ot hard boiled egg and cracked corn.

In the morning give half of raw egg to each and leed wheat ; at noon a piece of sour apple. In the evening teed cracked corn discontinuing the wheat from now, as it may physic when you do not want it to do so.

It lought at night feed a little pearl barley or cracked corn and a few dips of water, an hour or so after feeding, exercising lightly. Always handle your birds gently as pos- sible, change straw in coop daily ; allow them to become accustomed to lamp light, if to be fought at night ; keep in a warm, well ventilated place.

The noted Dr. Cooper was among the first to lay down definite rules for heeling. These are generally known to the cocking world, and are as follows : " Let your bird be held by a competent person so that the inside of leg is perfectly level ; cover the spur with a piece of damp kid so as to get the socket of the gaff to fit tightly and prevent its turning or shifting.

Then take your thumb and forefinger and work the hind toe of the cock ; while doing this you will see the leader of the leg rise and fall at the upper joint ot leg. You will set the right gaff on a line with the outside The above cut shows the vehitive points ou the cord which are the guide for the proper setting of the heel. Those on the left of page show where a head and meek hitting cock should be heeled, those on the right a shuffling cock.

Be caretul not to set the point too tar in, as it would cause the cock to cut himselt. When you have the gaff arranged properly, tie it with good wax ends, but not too tight as to cramp the legs or toes. After the gaffs are tied on wet your fingers and pull the cock's toes so they will not be cramped.

Grist in his " Keep " modifies the method ot Dr. Cooper in that he directs that the right gaff should be set on a line with the outside of leader at the upper joint, and the left gaff instead of on a line with the inside of leader advised by Dr. Cooper he sets one- eighth of an inch farther out than the right gaff. This method is advised for one and one- quarter inch up to two inches for day fighting. If for night fighting, he directs that the right gaff be set on a line with outer edge of leg, and the left gaff one-eighth of an inch farther out.

You may have a shuffling cock that may be a high or low shufBer, or vou may have a mixed fighter. Although I dislike to differ from the ex- cellent authorities quoted, it has always been my belief and experience that cocks should be heeled in keeping with their fighting pe- culiarities, which peculiarities should invari- ably be ascertained by sparring the cock, carefully noting the same and heel him ac- cordingly. In the first place, the cock should be in perfect readiness to fight ; that is, cut out, his heels having been previously sawed off one-halt inch from the leg.

See that you have perfect light and are comfortably seated. It the right heel is to be heeled first, in- struct the holder of the bird to put both knees close together, laying the cock on his right side in the lap of the holder, his right arm being under the right wing, clasping the shank of the right leg with his thumb and middle hnger, allowing the index finger to extend underneath the shank toward the toes on the under side.

This is done as support to the leg while heeling. The leg should not be raised nor lowered nor held too tightly. The chamois skin strips having been selected, being one-half inch in width, any length desired unless re- stricted, a small loop-hole should be cut about one-half inch from the end of each of the long strips. Place the heel upon the stub with the right hand, supporting the cock's leg with the left hand, draw both ends of the leather between the left hand supporting the leg.

With the right hand you work the hind toe backward and forward to enable you to locate the cord at the upper joint. The 22 right heel is now on the right leg; draw the heel on cord and hold again with left hand, working the toe again, locate the center of cord, to which point you draw the point ot the heel ; this being done, be carelul not to move the heel while drawing leathers closely around the windings, ask the holder to allow his index finger to hold the leathers in place.

Taking up the wax-end, ascertain the cen- ter ; first wind below the heel, once around, then above, once around ; winding below again vou will bring the strings to the top, making a loop around the blade at the top ot socket with each string, then down again on the same side, and continue to wind above and below until satisfied that heel has been safely tied. Be caretul not to wind too tight so as to compress or coid the cock's leg; the toes should be carefully pulled ; then by placing the cock on a round perch, as a broom han- dle supported on edge ot chair or table, if cock is able to grasp the same readily with his toes you may be assured he is not corded.

The above method of adjusting and tying on the heels should always be carefully carried out. The left leg should be heeled as follows : Keep well in mind the center of the cord upon which you set the other heel, which you will again locate by working the hind toe. Now determine the middle distance between the center of the cord and the inside edge of cord ; set your lett heel directly on this point, carrying out the same method of packing and tieing advised for right leg.

You have now heeled perfectly a cock for head and neck hitting, by some called a breaking fighter. For a shuffling cock the above instruction differs but little, but you should be cautious to observe and bear in mind their importance i n the cutting qualities which will be produced 24 The right leg for a shuffing cock is to be heeled by setting the point ol blade midway between the center and inner edge of cord, the left heel to be set on the inner edge of cord but no farther.

If the cock heeled is a high shnfher, heel him the same as a head and neck hitter. In- variably all game cocks strike closer with left leg than with right. Should it be notic- able that the right stub sets higher on leg :jhan the left, you will know that the cock strikes closer with right foot; in that instance the heeling should be reversed according to the style ol fighting produced by the cock.

To become a successful pitter, one must never loose his head in a fight. A neat and clever handler will always be possessed of a small vial of witch hazel or other wash, as may be selected by himself, and soft sponge to properly nurse his bird between pittings, it allowed by rules govern- ing. Never fail to replace the wings to their natural position, enabling a cock to produce whatever speed he may possess.

If rules will permit, never fail to clear the throat of a groggy cock as often as necessary during time allowed ior nandling. Quick and active handling at the proper time may enable one to prevent a cock's becoming bad- ly rattled or seriously injured about the head and neck. Never fail to carefully examine eyes, keep- 28 ing as clean as possible.

It blinked, be care- ful in pitting to give the good side toward the opponent. In some articles, hovering over your cock is considered untair, even if permitted by the rules governing. Give your bird plenty of room. Careful handling during conditioning and pitting will protect yourself against one who is constantly hovering or trying to ge't mixed up with his own bird.

Coditioning feed for cock fighting