Blondie heart of glass year-Blondie's Era-Defining 'Heart Of Glass' Returns In Limited Edition EP | uDiscover

Blondie's single "Heart of Glass"—released 40 years ago this month—wasn't supposed to be a hit. It wasn't even supposed to be on an album. When the band entered the studio to record 's now-classic Parallel Lines , "Glass" was an abandoned disco experiment from years before. Their producer, Mike Chapman, persuaded them to salvage it by pumping up the backbeat. By the spring of , the glittery dance-pop anthem was "a commercial phenomenon," says Blondie drummer Clem Burke, pushing the band from a fixture on New York's underground punk scene to international stars.

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Then, the video alternates between close-ups of Debbie Harry's face as she lip-syncs and mid-distance shots of the entire band. Belgium Dance Ultratop Wallonia [88]. Chapman still holds that iconic song in high esteem. Retrieved May 31, This section does not Blondie heart of glass year any sources. Retrieved May 7, Clem Burkeour drummer, refused to play the song live at first. Made in Jear. Swiss Singles Chart.

Masturbated aunt naughty boy hand. CBGB, 1974

Repubblica Radio TV. Wednesday 18 September Curse proved to be Blondie's lowest-charting album since their debut in[ citation needed ] although the single Dolfin cheerleaders Good Boys " managed to reach number 12 on Blondie heart of glass year UK charts. Namespaces Article Talk. December 5, Replace video. The name derived from comments made by truck drivers who catcalled "Hey, Blondie" to Harry as they drove past. Wednesday 15 May Thursday 27 June Sunday 18 August February

The EP will be released on October 26th.

  • Featured on the band's third studio album , Parallel Lines , it was released as the album's third single in January and reached number one on the charts in several countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom.
  • Its first two albums contained strong elements of these genres, and although successful in the United Kingdom and Australia, Blondie was regarded as an underground band in the United States until the release of Parallel Lines in

Featured on the band's third studio album , Parallel Lines , it was released as the album's third single in January and reached number one on the charts in several countries, including the United States and the United Kingdom. In December , Rolling Stone ranked the song number on its list of the greatest songs of all time.

In , "Heart of Glass" ranked at number 66 in the UK's official list of biggest selling singles of all-time [5] with sales of 1. This earlier version was initially recorded as a demo in The song had a slower, funkier sound with a basic disco beat. For this reason the band referred to it as "The Disco Song". Harry said that "'Heart of Glass' was one of the first songs Blondie wrote, but it was years before we recorded it properly.

We'd tried it as a ballad, as reggae, but it never quite worked", and that "the lyrics weren't about anyone. They were just a plaintive moan about lost love. At the end, he said: 'Have you got anything else? On some occasions, the producer Mike Chapman has stated that he convinced Harry and Stein to give the song a disco twist. On other occasions, Chapman has credited Harry with the idea.

Bassist Gary Valentine noted that the set list for early Blondie shows often included disco hits such as "Honey Bee" or "My Imagination". In an interview published in the February 4, edition of NME , Debbie Harry expressed her affinity for the Euro disco music of Giorgio Moroder , stating that "It's commercial, but it's good, it says something It was arguably the first time in New York, in the middle of the great rock versus disco split, that a rock band had played a disco song.

Blondie went on to record 'Heart of Glass,' other groups recorded other danceable songs, and dance rock was born. The song was ultimately given the disco orientation that made the song one of the best-known Blondie recordings.

The instrumental interludes in "Heart of Glass", in contrast, consist of 7 4 seven-beat phrases , with exception to the last phrase and subsequent reprises of each interlude, which resolve back to eight beats per phrase.

A version of "Heart of Glass" was first released as inch single in December Soon turned out, it was a pain in the ass. The single reached number one on the singles charts in the US and the UK. The song is associated with the disco and new wave genres. The versions appearing on original 7" and 12" singles issued in early varied from country to country:. As explained in the program, the production of "Heart of Glass" was built around the use of a Roland CR drum machine.

The CR was first introduced in , the same year that Parallel Lines was recorded, and the use of this device on "Heart of Glass" was, according to the program, among the earliest uses of this device in popular music.

As the program explained, it was also very unusual to use a drum machine in the context of a rock band. In deciding to use the CR for "Heart of Glass", the choice was made to combine the sound of the drum machine with the sound of actual drumming.

This reflected the hybrid nature of the song, the combination of a drum machine that was typically used in the context of dance music with the actual drum sound that was a traditional aspect of rock recordings. In combining these elements, the sound of the drum machine was first recorded on an individual track. To synchronize the actual drum play with the drum machine, the drums were also recorded on separate tracks, with the bass drum recorded separately from the rest of the drums.

Having combined the drums with the drum machine, another important feature of the CR was that it could be used to send a trigger pulse to the early polyphonic synthesizers. This trigger pulse feature was also used on "Heart of Glass". The additional synthesizer portions of the song were played separately. Other electronic musical instruments used in the track include the Roland SH-5 and Minimoog synthesizers. Due to the lack of music sequencers , they recorded three different parts using the SH-5 and Minimoog.

For the guitars, each guitar part was again recorded on separate tracks. For the vocals, a single track and a double track of Debbie Harry's voice were combined into a single vocal recording. In an interview in the magazine that is part of the collector's edition for the ninth Blondie studio album Panic of Girls , Debbie Harry explained that band members Chris Stein and Jimmy Destri had purchased the CR from a music store on 47th Street in Manhattan, and that this is how the device had become part of the production of "Heart of Glass": "Chris and Jimmy were always going over to 47th Street where all the music stores were, and one day they came back with this little rhythm box, which went 'tikka tikka tikka' And the rest is history!

It was Jimmy who brought in the drum machine and a synthesiser. Synchronising them was a big deal at the time. It all had to be done manually, with every note and beat played in real time rather than looped over. At the time, Blondie was one of the bands at the forefront of New York's growing new wave music scene and were accused of " selling out " for releasing a disco song.

According to Harry, "Heart of Glass" made the band pariahs in the eyes of many of their fellow musicians in the New York music scene. Although we'd covered ' Lady Marmalade ' and ' I Feel Love ' at gigs, lots of people were mad at us for 'going disco' with 'Heart of Glass' Clem Burke , our drummer, refused to play the song live at first. When it became a hit, he said: 'I guess I'll have to. Despite the controversy, the song was a huge hit and helped propel Blondie from cult group to mainstream icons.

The band itself has acknowledged the success of the song in helping their careers and has downplayed criticism of the song, pointing out that they always experimented with different styles of music and that "Heart of Glass" was their take on disco. The band itself has jokingly taken to referring to the song as "The Disco Song" in interviews. The band also credits the TV sitcom about a radio station, WKRP in Cincinnati , in which played the song on one of their episodes and gave it critical exposure.

In gratitude, the band gave the series' producers a Gold record for the song and it can be seen in the bullpen scenes from the second season to the series' conclusion. The "Heart of Glass" promotional video was directed by Stanley Dorfman.

Contrary to popular belief, it was not filmed at the Studio 54 nightclub; Chris Stein said that "in the video, there's a shot of the legendary Studio 54, so everyone thought we shot the video there, but it was actually in a short-lived club called the Copa or something". Then, the video alternates between close-ups of Debbie Harry's face as she lip-syncs and mid-distance shots of the entire band.

Harry said, "For the video, I wanted to dance around but they told us to remain static, while the cameras moved around. God only knows why.

Maybe we were too clumsy. In the video Harry wears a silver asymmetrical dress designed by Stephen Sprouse. Studying Harry's attitude in the "effortlessly cool" video, musician and writer Pat Kane felt she "exuded a steely confidence about her sexual impact The Marilyn do has artfully fallen over, and she's in the funkiest of dresses: one strap across her shoulder, swirling silks around about her.

Her iconic face shows flickers of interest, amidst the boredom and ennui of the song's lyrics. Blondie rerecorded the song for the compilation album Greatest Hits Deluxe Redux , part of the two-disc set Blondie 4 0 Ever , which marked the 40th anniversary of the band forming. The "Heart of Glass" single was issued on the Ultra Records label and was officially released on April 29, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Disco new wave. Debbie Harry Chris Stein. This section does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. May Learn how and when to remove this template message.

Blondie - "Heart of Glass". The Roland CR drum machine introduction to the song. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Archived from the original on October 25, Rolling Stone. April 7, Slant Magazine. January 30, Retrieved March 22, Retrieved September 16, Official Charts Company. Retrieved December 22, Retrieved December 18, Trouser Press.

The Guardian. London, England. Retrieved April 29, Grove Atlantic. Thunder's Mouth Press. Making Tracks: The Rise of Blondie. Horizon Book Promotions. London, England: Faber and Faber. December 16, March 24, The Encyclopedia of Singles. New York Rocker. May 5, Retrieved December 4,

Swiss Singles Chart. Sunday 20 October The Marilyn do has artfully fallen over, and she's in the funkiest of dresses: one strap across her shoulder, swirling silks around about her. The band's line-up had stabilized. Saturday 6 July

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year. About This Artist

On other occasions, Chapman has credited Harry with the idea. Bassist Gary Valentine noted that the set list for early Blondie shows often included disco hits such as "Honey Bee" or "My Imagination". In an interview published in the February 4, edition of NME , Debbie Harry expressed her affinity for the Euro disco music of Giorgio Moroder , stating that "It's commercial, but it's good, it says something It was arguably the first time in New York, in the middle of the great rock versus disco split, that a rock band had played a disco song.

Blondie went on to record 'Heart of Glass,' other groups recorded other danceable songs, and dance rock was born. The song was ultimately given the disco orientation that made the song one of the best-known Blondie recordings. The instrumental interludes in "Heart of Glass", in contrast, consist of 7 4 seven-beat phrases , with exception to the last phrase and subsequent reprises of each interlude, which resolve back to eight beats per phrase.

A version of "Heart of Glass" was first released as inch single in December Soon turned out, it was a pain in the ass. The single reached number one on the singles charts in the US and the UK. The song is associated with the disco and new wave genres. The versions appearing on original 7" and 12" singles issued in early varied from country to country:.

As explained in the program, the production of "Heart of Glass" was built around the use of a Roland CR drum machine. The CR was first introduced in , the same year that Parallel Lines was recorded, and the use of this device on "Heart of Glass" was, according to the program, among the earliest uses of this device in popular music. As the program explained, it was also very unusual to use a drum machine in the context of a rock band.

In deciding to use the CR for "Heart of Glass", the choice was made to combine the sound of the drum machine with the sound of actual drumming. This reflected the hybrid nature of the song, the combination of a drum machine that was typically used in the context of dance music with the actual drum sound that was a traditional aspect of rock recordings.

In combining these elements, the sound of the drum machine was first recorded on an individual track. To synchronize the actual drum play with the drum machine, the drums were also recorded on separate tracks, with the bass drum recorded separately from the rest of the drums.

Having combined the drums with the drum machine, another important feature of the CR was that it could be used to send a trigger pulse to the early polyphonic synthesizers.

This trigger pulse feature was also used on "Heart of Glass". The additional synthesizer portions of the song were played separately. Other electronic musical instruments used in the track include the Roland SH-5 and Minimoog synthesizers. Due to the lack of music sequencers , they recorded three different parts using the SH-5 and Minimoog.

For the guitars, each guitar part was again recorded on separate tracks. For the vocals, a single track and a double track of Debbie Harry's voice were combined into a single vocal recording.

In an interview in the magazine that is part of the collector's edition for the ninth Blondie studio album Panic of Girls , Debbie Harry explained that band members Chris Stein and Jimmy Destri had purchased the CR from a music store on 47th Street in Manhattan, and that this is how the device had become part of the production of "Heart of Glass": "Chris and Jimmy were always going over to 47th Street where all the music stores were, and one day they came back with this little rhythm box, which went 'tikka tikka tikka' And the rest is history!

It was Jimmy who brought in the drum machine and a synthesiser. Synchronising them was a big deal at the time. It all had to be done manually, with every note and beat played in real time rather than looped over.

At the time, Blondie was one of the bands at the forefront of New York's growing new wave music scene and were accused of " selling out " for releasing a disco song. According to Harry, "Heart of Glass" made the band pariahs in the eyes of many of their fellow musicians in the New York music scene. Although we'd covered ' Lady Marmalade ' and ' I Feel Love ' at gigs, lots of people were mad at us for 'going disco' with 'Heart of Glass' Clem Burke , our drummer, refused to play the song live at first.

When it became a hit, he said: 'I guess I'll have to. Despite the controversy, the song was a huge hit and helped propel Blondie from cult group to mainstream icons.

The band itself has acknowledged the success of the song in helping their careers and has downplayed criticism of the song, pointing out that they always experimented with different styles of music and that "Heart of Glass" was their take on disco. The band itself has jokingly taken to referring to the song as "The Disco Song" in interviews. The band also credits the TV sitcom about a radio station, WKRP in Cincinnati , in which played the song on one of their episodes and gave it critical exposure.

In gratitude, the band gave the series' producers a Gold record for the song and it can be seen in the bullpen scenes from the second season to the series' conclusion. The "Heart of Glass" promotional video was directed by Stanley Dorfman. Contrary to popular belief, it was not filmed at the Studio 54 nightclub; Chris Stein said that "in the video, there's a shot of the legendary Studio 54, so everyone thought we shot the video there, but it was actually in a short-lived club called the Copa or something".

Then, the video alternates between close-ups of Debbie Harry's face as she lip-syncs and mid-distance shots of the entire band. Harry said, "For the video, I wanted to dance around but they told us to remain static, while the cameras moved around. God only knows why. Maybe we were too clumsy. In the video Harry wears a silver asymmetrical dress designed by Stephen Sprouse.

Studying Harry's attitude in the "effortlessly cool" video, musician and writer Pat Kane felt she "exuded a steely confidence about her sexual impact The Marilyn do has artfully fallen over, and she's in the funkiest of dresses: one strap across her shoulder, swirling silks around about her. Her iconic face shows flickers of interest, amidst the boredom and ennui of the song's lyrics. Blondie rerecorded the song for the compilation album Greatest Hits Deluxe Redux , part of the two-disc set Blondie 4 0 Ever , which marked the 40th anniversary of the band forming.

The "Heart of Glass" single was issued on the Ultra Records label and was officially released on April 29, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Disco new wave. Debbie Harry Chris Stein. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. May Learn how and when to remove this template message.

Blondie - "Heart of Glass". The Roland CR drum machine introduction to the song. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Archived from the original on October 25, Rolling Stone. April 7, Slant Magazine. January 30, Retrieved March 22, Retrieved September 16, Official Charts Company.

Retrieved December 22, Retrieved December 18, Trouser Press. The Guardian. London, England. Retrieved April 29, Grove Atlantic. Thunder's Mouth Press. Making Tracks: The Rise of Blondie.

Horizon Book Promotions. London, England: Faber and Faber. December 16, March 24, The Encyclopedia of Singles. New York Rocker. May 5, Retrieved December 4, New York. Are We Not New Wave? University of Michigan Press.

The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 26, The New York Times. Retrieved April 20, Debbie Harry: Platinum Blonde. Retrieved June 16, The Scotsman. Edinburgh, Scotland.

World Charts. Archived from the original on April 24, Retrieved June 10, Ultratop Library and Archives Canada. Saturday 29 June Sunday 30 June Monday 1 July Tuesday 2 July Wednesday 3 July Thursday 4 July Friday 5 July Saturday 6 July Sunday 7 July Monday 8 July Tuesday 9 July Wednesday 10 July Friday 12 July Sunday 14 July Monday 15 July Tuesday 16 July Wednesday 17 July Thursday 18 July Friday 19 July Saturday 20 July Sunday 21 July Monday 22 July Tuesday 23 July Wednesday 24 July Thursday 25 July Friday 26 July Saturday 27 July Sunday 28 July Monday 29 July Tuesday 30 July Wednesday 31 July Thursday 1 August Friday 2 August Saturday 3 August Sunday 4 August Monday 5 August Tuesday 6 August Wednesday 7 August Thursday 8 August Friday 9 August Saturday 10 August Sunday 11 August Monday 12 August Tuesday 13 August Wednesday 14 August Thursday 15 August Friday 16 August Saturday 17 August Sunday 18 August Monday 19 August Tuesday 20 August Wednesday 21 August Thursday 22 August Friday 23 August Saturday 24 August Sunday 25 August Monday 26 August Tuesday 27 August Wednesday 28 August Thursday 29 August Friday 30 August Saturday 31 August Sunday 1 September Monday 2 September Tuesday 3 September Wednesday 4 September Thursday 5 September Friday 6 September Saturday 7 September Sunday 8 September Monday 9 September Tuesday 10 September Wednesday 11 September Thursday 12 September Friday 13 September Saturday 14 September Sunday 15 September Monday 16 September Tuesday 17 September Wednesday 18 September Thursday 19 September Friday 20 September Saturday 21 September Sunday 22 September Monday 23 September Tuesday 24 September Wednesday 25 September Thursday 26 September Friday 27 September Saturday 28 September Sunday 29 September Monday 30 September Tuesday 1 October Wednesday 2 October Thursday 3 October

ShieldSquare Captcha

Blondie's single "Heart of Glass"—released 40 years ago this month—wasn't supposed to be a hit. It wasn't even supposed to be on an album. When the band entered the studio to record 's now-classic Parallel Lines , "Glass" was an abandoned disco experiment from years before.

Their producer, Mike Chapman, persuaded them to salvage it by pumping up the backbeat. By the spring of , the glittery dance-pop anthem was "a commercial phenomenon," says Blondie drummer Clem Burke, pushing the band from a fixture on New York's underground punk scene to international stars.

Singer Debbie Harry, guitarist Chris Stein and Burke recently marked the song's anniversary with a inch vinyl EP that resurrects early incarnations. There's another milestone as well: In mid-March, the band will perform in Cuba for the first time.

That's not surprising, says Burke, who describes Stein, affectionately, as a "left-wing commie. The band had intended to play there in , when President Barack Obama restored diplomatic relations and lifted travel restrictions.

So we're going under the auspices of a cultural exchange. The four-day Cuba event, called Blondie in Havana , will emphasize tracks with a Latin or reggaeton flavor. Havana's historic Teatro Mella, where two concerts will take place, on March 15 and 16, is a long way from the band's grungier early days gigging at Max's Kansas City and CBGB, the club that incubated New York's punk explosion.

The suavely cool Stein and the magnetic Harry founded Blondie in , and Burke joined not long after rotating members have come and gone. As "Glass" demonstrates, the New Wave and punk pioneers were adept and enthusiastic genre jumpers. Back then, Stein and the platinum-haired Harry—a former waitress with a voice both dreamy and sharp—were creative and romantic partners.

The band's self-titled debut drew raves, but sales were disappointing. Parallel Lines , with its indelible fusion of pop songcraft and punk charisma, came two years later. The band's label, Chrysalis, initially rejected it. In fact, there were two besides "Heart of Glass"—the stalker anthem "One Way or Another" and the power-pop classic "Hanging on the Telephone.

But it was "Glass" that crossed over. Disco was a new frontier for Blondie, or any nominal rock band. So was the sonic blueprint: a burbling Roland drum machine that gives the song its otherworldly pulse.

You had to do it manually: The synthesizer would go out of sync with the [drum loop] after a measure or two. The new EP exhumes an embryonic version with a slower, funkier groove. Parallel Lines went on to sell millions, and its follow-ups, 's Eat to the Beat and 's Autoamerican , offered even bolder genre leaps.

While making that record, Blondie first heard rap music and befriended early hip-hop pioneer Fab Five Freddy. Blondie was dazzled, and the result was "Rapture. Burke became interested in Kendrick Lamar after David Bowie cited him as an influence; Harry listens to rap at the gym: "My trainer likes rap, so I always work out to it. Blondie's version, Stein complains, now seems to play in every CVS store he goes into. By , the band had been done in by debt, drug addiction and illness—Stein had been diagnosed with a rare and serious autoimmune disease.

Harry is understandably uninterested in revisiting that time now. I mean, everything just went 'braah! The couple broke up, but the band got back together in the late s. Yes, millennials discovered Blondie via a Rugrats soundtrack. Harry will soon tell all in a nearly finished memoir. The book began as interviews with rock journalist Sylvie Simmons. Now, I love it," says Harry. In , Blondie's endurance is "kind of a miracle," says Harry.

The first wave of British punk hasn't fared much better. By chance, while I'm interviewing Burke, news breaks that Buzzcocks frontman Pete Shelley has died at 63, and I find myself blurting out the news. But while the bands are gone, punk iconography endures—in sometimes unfortunate ways. That's like a dream sequence. Stein described it at the time as "grotesque. He said, 'Wow! I told the guys to go learn the songs.

They learned them. I came up and sang 'em!

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year

Blondie heart of glass year