Elevated model track train-Elevated track construction | N-Scale | Model trains, Train layouts, Scale models

The Elevated Train models are N-scale They are 1" tall by 4" long when complete. There are five different L train cars available. Each represents a different train line serving a different part of the city, as well as the different types of rolling stock on the CTA system. Download instructions to add N-scale wheels to your elevated train car: TrainChassis.

Elevated model track train

Elevated model track train

Coal was a major product transported. The timing of this tour is coordinated with operating sessions on three Lakeshore division layouts Friday evening. Elevated model track train Track Grade and Train Issues Maximum grade is a function of three factors: the power of your locomotives, the weight of your locomotives, Elevated model track train the number and weight of the cars in your trains. This layout has a loop of track with a yard. Continue to 5 of 6 below. Mainline is 37 feet long. The layout Girls strip n ude a teack turntable and the need for helper units. There is no simple answer to what is an acceptable standard, however.

Double dutch jump rope in mississippi. Designing Layouts to Prevent Derailments

Apply power leads to Sex yells track Elevated model track train lEevated the grade to make sure your locomotives can pull up the hill, making adjustments if necessary. A 4 car subway train had trouble with them. Elevated model track train cork rail bed in place along the track line temporarily with masking tape, followed by the track line with a few rail nails. Search the Community. I am presently building an elevated line modeled after the tarin in chicago. Sign up. Member since December, 2, posts. Phoebe Vet. Posted mdoel cuyama on Tuesday, November 15, PM. I was speaking with a gentlemen from Micro Engineering a few months back inquiring about bridge shoes Dick penton merrill lynch while we were talking he asked what ME bridges I had built and how did I like them etc.

Track grade is the slope of a railroad track.

  • My son and I are realitively new at model railroads and are working on our first layout.
  • If you have graduated from ovals and basic turnouts on your model railway, the next step is to create some elevated tracks and terrain.
  • Here's a link to the Walthers page for one of them.
  • .

Planning a model railroad can be a hobby unto itself. Here lies the first secret to layout design; planning doesn't stop when construction begins. Don't be afraid to let your plans evolve as your layout progresses. But if you're still looking for ways to "get it right" from the beginning, here are some of the things to consider when designing your model railroad.

What are the five essential elements in any model railroad plan? These factors will guide all of your other decisions. Theme: What are you modeling?

This includes the prototype, locale, and era. It also includes the operations you'll be replicating. You have a lot of freedom of choice here, but that doesn't make this decision any less essential.

There is, after all, no reason to build a model railroad if it's not the railroad you want. A model railroad doesn't have to follow a specific prototype. Many modelers freelance , picking and choosing what they like best. Some even create their own railroad names, rosters, paint schemes, etc.

It's your railroad, model what you like! Area: How much space do you have? But don't let the fact that you only have a small bookshelf convince you that you can't have a model railroad. Multi-level designs, modular layouts and other creative alternatives allow you to squeeze a lot into any odd sized or shaped space.

Standards: Every model railroad has a list of constraints: minimum radius, maximum grade, etc. There is no simple answer to what is an acceptable standard, however. The theme of your layout will have a lot to say about what sort of standards need to be applied.

Take minimum radius for example. An inch radius curve is the standard train set curve in HO. It will work fine however for an HO scale industrial or narrow-gauge theme.

In N scale , 18 inches is a very comfortable curve for just about everything. For larger scales, 18 inches is going to limit you to very toy-like trains or a nice O scale trolley layout, or a larger scale switching layout without deep curves.

Time and budget: Like space, we all live within certain time and budget constraints. Be realistic about what you can afford to build and maintain. Many modelers have homes filled with unassembled kits without a layout to call home. Starting small, planning for expansion, or building in modules or sections can get you running sooner and get you past those beginner's fears.

The size of the trains you choose will go a long way toward determining many of the subsequent standards you'll want to follow in your plan. Combining gauges on a single layout is another matter altogether. Standard and narrow gauge trains all share a common scale, so your scenery won't have to compromise.

Modeling an interchange between different gauge lines can add a lot of operation and visual interest. Since narrow gauge trains can normally negotiate tighter curves than their standard gauge cousins, they may be a way to get into a larger scale without needing a larger space.

Now that you've laid out the essentials, what do you really want? Take that basic theme you've already created and build upon it. Making a list: Start with a list of all the things you want on your layout. Your list should include things like scenic features, operating schemes, control systems, benchwork designs, and any other special desires.

Maybe you already have a favorite prototype. If so, take a look at your list and see what part of that railroad best suits your needs. A popular line like the Santa Fe, for example, could be used for a prototype for anything from a busy mountain mainline, to a seaside port switcher, to a flatlands racetrack.

Maybe you don't know exactly what railroad you want to model, but you know what you want your layout to look like, or how you want it to operate. Your list can help point you in the right direction.

It's also a good idea to include smaller goals in these early plans as well. But keeping this goal in mind from the beginning will help ensure it gets done in the end. Checking it twice: It's good to get everything on the list to start.

But once your list is complete, be prepared to start cutting it back. You probably won't have room for everything. Let the negotiations begin! This may take some time. With so many options available, there may be multiple ways to get what you want.

You may not be able to change the essential elements of your layout plan, but you can be very creative in how you work within your constraints.

You will probably revisit your priority list frequently as you proceed with the design. Now that you know what you want and how much space, money and time you have to build it, it's time to start making some hard choices and compromise and pull it all together.

Some compromises are harder to make than others. If you really want a long mainline but don't have a lot of space, you'll need to consider a smaller scale or perhaps a multiple level layout. Model trains can climb relatively steep grades and negotiate tight curves and switches, but they have their limits.

Clearances in yards, tunnels, bridges, etc. These minimums will be determined by the model trains you've chosen. Even the largest HO scale trains will negotiate a inch radius curve.

These trains would look much better on a larger radius, however. You may decide that you want to maintain at least a inch or inch minimum radius. If you do, it will greatly impact the track design you create.

Perhaps you can live with a inch curve in just this one corner, or hide a tighter curve in a tunnel. Just make sure you can be happy with whatever compromises you choose and don't sacrifice quality for quantity. No matter what scale you choose, what railroad you model, or how large your railroad may be, there are certain design tips that will never steer you wrong.

This can have an impact on the size and shape or your layout. Access also includes tunnels and other long stretches of hidden track, and other important things like switch machines, electrical components, and operating accessories. If you do have the option of filling an entire room with trains, remember to leave enough room for you and your guests to move around as well! Aisle width is as important as platform width. A looping layout plan may add a longer run, but it detracts from the appearance that the train is actually going somewhere.

Especially on a small layout, a little empty space actually makes the railroad seem larger. Height: There is no single best height to build your train layout , but it is still an important consideration in any design.

Then there are multi-level layouts which combine the best and worst features of both. Take a look at your list of needs and consider the layout height carefully before you begin construction. Ultimately, choose a height that is comfortable for you. Extending a track or two to the end of the current platform, for example, will allow you to add on without cutting into existing tracks.

Consider future needs when purchasing a power supply or control system as well. Not only will you be out the cost of the basic system later, but you may also find yourself replacing a lot of wiring under the platform.

Drafting a plan can be a lot of fun. There is a challenge in replicating a subject within constraints coupled with the artistic expression of creating a unique design. Indeed, many enjoy design so much they never build an actual layout. Computer design: Many different design programs are available for model railroaders. Some create three-dimensional views or run virtual trains over the layout. Which, if any, program is right for you depends on the complexity of your plan and your comfort with computer software.

If you really enjoy computer design, or if you are simply willing to put in the time to learn, a high-end program may be a worthwhile investment. The ability to take a flat design and show it in three dimensions is an asset on layouts with grades and multiple track levels.

The ability to design in layers allows you to see potential construction problems before they happen. Layout design BC before computers : There is nothing wrong with drawing a plan with your own hands. Just like a computer program, with practice, you can get very proficient at drawing track plans that not only look good but work well. Start with a rough sketch. Some amazing layouts got their start on the back of a cocktail napkin or a school notebook. Next, add some actual measurements to the plan.

A ruler and compass are really all you need. Graph paper can be helpful in maintaining scale. Track planning templates with standard sizes track pieces are also useful and available in every major scale.

Your plan can be as simple as an outline of the platform and track or done in layers to include benchwork design and scenic features. And of course, if you change your mind, an eraser or a blank sheet of paper is never far away.

I know this is a very old thread, but Walthers is expecting this product soon. Posted by elblis on Tuesday, November 01, PM. How to Build a Foam Core Model. Search the Community. I am presently building an elevated line modeled after the "L" in chicago. Allegheny Member since March, 2, posts. I am only evaluating whether or not I want to do it.

Elevated model track train

Elevated model track train

Elevated model track train

Elevated model track train. Taking Model Trains to a New Elevation

Apply layers of crumpled newspaper to areas between the foam layers to add natural landscape shapes and tape down with masking tape. Lay cork rail bed in place along the track line temporarily with masking tape, followed by the track line with a few rail nails. Apply power leads to the track and test the grade to make sure your locomotives can pull up the hill, making adjustments if necessary.

This allows for better viewing. Bridges are another form of elevated track and can be graded and supported with commercially available structures. Test clearances if you have tracks that run under elevated structures like bridges by running boxcars and engines through the passageway before finalizing the track. Test your track with a full train of cars just to make sure the engine can handle the grade before finalizing. Sean Kotz has been writing professionally since and is a regular columnist for the Roanoke Times.

He holds a Master of Arts in literature from Virginia Tech. Tip Begin with a good track plan. Many magazines and books can help you find or create one. Commercially pre-cut grades are available and save time and energy. Do not put a turnout on a grade or near the bottom of a grade as it will cause derailments. I am planning a short elevated line for my layout but fear the task of building long elevated support structure from scratch. Posted by jecorbett on Saturday, March 18, PM.

Rix has a line of elevated highway components that might be modifiable for an elevated railroad line. I thought they made them specifically for elevated rail lines as well but I can't find them on the website. If it wasn't Rix, I'm sure somebody made this at one time not too long ago. Member since September, posts. Posted by abbieleibowitz on Saturday, March 18, PM.

Micro Engineering makes a great line of bridges, structural pieces for an elevated urban subway system and piers. But Walthers shows some samples on their website. Good luck! Posted by bryanbell on Sunday, March 19, AM.

Phoebe Vet. Dave Lackawanna Route of the Phoebe Snow. Member since July, 70 posts. Posted by nw2 on Thursday, May 06, PM. Chuck Modeling Central Japan in September, - with deck girders on masonry piers. Thanks guys. I appreciate the input. Member since March, 2, posts. Just my 2 cents worth, I spent the rest on trains. If you choked a Smurf what color would he turn? Member since January, From: Canada, eh? Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, May 06, PM.

I used their structural members on this coal dealer's facility: Wayne. Member since April, posts. Posted by justinjhnsn3 on Friday, May 07, PM. Member since July, From: west coast 4, posts. Posted by rrebell on Friday, May 07, PM. Someone is making laser cut wood ones now also, very impressive. Member since December, 2, posts. Posted by chutton01 on Friday, May 07, PM.

Member since February, 6, posts. Posted by maxman on Friday, May 07, PM. Search the Community. Model Railroader Newsletter See all. Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox! Sign up. Model Railroader Newsletter Sign up! Follow us: Facebook. Posted by jecorbett on Saturday, March 18, PM Rix has a line of elevated highway components that might be modifiable for an elevated railroad line. Posted by abbieleibowitz on Saturday, March 18, PM Micro Engineering makes a great line of bridges, structural pieces for an elevated urban subway system and piers.

Posted by tomikawaTT on Thursday, May 06, PM Pretty good 'foobie' modeling of typical New York specifically, Bronx elevated rapid transit structure can be built using Atlas girder bridge components. Allegheny Member since March, 2, posts.

Build Your Own Chicago Elevated Trains

Track grade is the slope of a railroad track. For example, if you have inches of model railroad track and the train climbs one inch, then the grade is 1 percent. When 25 inches of track rises 1 inch, the grade is 4 percent. Maximum grade is the steepest slope your trains can climb. Well-planned grades can make a layout interesting. Badly planned ones can be a disaster. The simple answer you will hear from many model railroad fans is to never use grades steeper than 2 percent.

However, that isn't the final answer. The largest manufacturer of model railroad landscape materials, Woodland Scenics, offers flexible incline foam for grading model railroad train layouts in grades of 2 percent, 3 percent, and 4 percent, and they continue to sell them. These grades aren't very steep for model trains, but they are steep grades for real-life trains. In real-life railroading, there are three classes of grades: 0.

Because of this limitation in real-life trains, some builders of prototypical model railroads will ridicule any grade steeper than 2 percent, calling them " toy train " layouts. Maximum grade is frequently dictated by available layout space. The implied requirement is that if you are building a small layout it should be flat. But why not a mountain grade railroad over a flat oval or figure eight? Maximum grade is a function of three factors: the power of your locomotives, the weight of your locomotives, and the number and weight of the cars in your trains.

That the locomotive's power is a factor is common sense; a weak locomotive won't pull many cars up a grade. But how the weight of the locomotive affects maximum grade isn't quite so obvious. The greater the weight, the greater the traction. This means wheels on lighter locomotives may slip where heavier locomotives can climb a grade. Larger scale locomotives may handle steep grades better than smaller scales.

Good N scale locomotives can pull around 15 cars up a 4 percent grade. But to some modelers, 15 cars is too short a train. With model train track curves the concern is the width of the space available to us. While curves can be used to break up the monotony of long straight sections of track, turning a train around with a degree curve , a necessity for continuous running layouts, taxes the limits of a narrow layout.

But interesting layouts frequently pass one track over another on bridges or trestles. The table lists clearances in various scales for bridges and tunnels. Their vertical clearance standards are based on their "H" dimension. However, there are numerous cases where tunnel portal products don't have sufficient clearance for models of modern locomotives and cars. Pantographs on electric locomotives increase clearance requirements too.

In order to raise a track to cross over itself, as in a simple figure eight, you need a grade that will raise the track to the clearance height. The table of clearances includes the lengths of the runs required to raise the track to the specified height for 2 percent, 3 percent, and 4 percent grades in various scales.

Remember that the track must also descend back to its starting level, so this length of the grade is required on each end of the bridge. The diagram shows N scale crossovers layouts for 2 percent and 4 percent grades. Ascending tracks are in green and descending tracks are in red. The 2 percent grade layout requires over 6 yards of length for the layout. To do this you raise the base elevation by one-half the tunnel clearance height.

Then you use grades to lower your track for the under and raise it for the over. This technique requires four half-length track grades instead of two full-length track grades. The diagram shows N scale figure eights with the grades split. The 4 percent grade layout now has a length of 3 yards.

The blue outer curves are the midpoints of the grades. We could further shorten the layout by making the curves part of the grade. However, curved grades have additional considerations. When you curve a grade, you increase the effective slope of the grade. The tighter the curve, the steeper your effective grade. An example is an inch radius curve with a 4 percent grade in N scale. An Athearn consolidation class locomotive would pull nine of its Overton passenger cars over this curved grade with no difficulty.

If you made an 8. When pulling longer trains, particularly in N scale , it is common to use the prototypical practice of pulling the train with multiple locomotives. This will also increase the size of a train that can be pulled up a grade, or the maximum grade for fewer cars.

In the Steam Era, it was not unusual for railroads to have "helper" locomotives standing by to be added to trains at steeper grades. While modern prototypical diesel trains usually put all the locomotives at the front of the train, some modelers put locomotives in the middle of a train. Another technique is to use a ghost car or "cheater car.

Randgust makes a ghost car kit and Reality Reduced has a video on how to put it together. What's My Maximum Grade? Maximum Track Grade and Train Issues Maximum grade is a function of three factors: the power of your locomotives, the weight of your locomotives, and the number and weight of the cars in your trains.

Model Railroad Layout Overpass Clearances. Continue to 5 of 9 below. Grading Runs for a Crossover. Split Your Track Grades. Curved Track Grades When you curve a grade, you increase the effective slope of the grade.

Multiple Unit Locomotives When pulling longer trains, particularly in N scale , it is common to use the prototypical practice of pulling the train with multiple locomotives. Continue to 9 of 9 below. Then you can always split your grades going down for the under the track and up for the over the track. Test your trains on the layout before you glue down your grade foam and track.

Make sure your locomotives can navigate all your turns and grades, pulling the number of cars you desire. If your favorite trains can't run on the layout, rethink your design.

There's always a solution, but sometimes it takes a while to find it. The Spruce Crafts uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using The Spruce Crafts, you accept our.

Elevated model track train

Elevated model track train