Tube feeding patient education-

You have been discharged with a gastrostomy tube, or G-tube. The G-tube was inserted through your belly abdominal wall and into your stomach. The tube will provide you with food, fluids, and medicine. Your G-tube may move in and out slightly. Call your healthcare provider right away.

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education

The following provides directions for administering medication through your feeding tube. You are being redirected. Cleanse the skin around the tube daily with soap and warm water as directed by your healthcare professional. Figure paitent. Follow any other Tube feeding patient education instructions from your healthcare professionals. If you will be traveling away from home, leave early to allow plenty of time and bring extras of everything.

Hiv petting. Types of Feeding Tubes

It is a noticeable device, and often people will need to overcome Tube feeding patient education appearance of the feeding tube. A person can remain on a feeding tube for as long or as short amount of time as needed. Your healthcare team Tube feeding patient education go over these guidelines before you leave the hospital. What you need to know about your dual chamber bag. EnFit tube port. You will need a syringe for the following steps:. Some hospitals now have nutrition teams and PEG requests are reviewed by this team and a consultant to assess whether PEG insertion is appropriate. If applicable, open roller clamp on pump set. Learn about insurance and coverage for infusion care. Was this helpful? BMC Gastroenterol.

This information will help teach you how to use the bolus method to feed yourself and take your medications through your percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy PEG , gastrostomy tube GT , or nasogastric tube NGT.

  • Professional Reference articles are designed for health professionals to use.
  • You have been discharged with a gastrostomy tube, or G-tube.
  • Both bolus feedings and pump-assisted feedings are discussed.

This information will help teach you how to use the bolus method to feed yourself and take your medications through your percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy PEG , gastrostomy tube GT , or nasogastric tube NGT. Nutrients provide energy and help you heal. The bolus method is a type of feeding where a syringe is used to send formula through your feeding tube.

You can take additional clear liquids through your feeding tube. You should take them at room temperature. You can choose the times of your feedings, as long as you reach your daily nutritional goals. Write in the times you prefer or your doctor, nurse practitioner NP , or dietitian recommends.

Bring your button adapter with you to the hospital, if you have one. Sit up in a chair during your tube feeding. You can buy a wedge pillow through websites such as Amazon. Sit or stand in an upright position for 1 hour after the feeding is finished. This will prevent the formula from entering your lungs if you vomit. Figure Inserting the syringe into the feeding tube. If you feel too full or are having nausea and vomiting, tell your doctor, dietitian, or NP.

Ask your doctor or pharmaci s t if you can ta k e your medications through your feeding tube. M o s t medications that you normally ta k e b y mouth can be ta k en through your feeding tube. M edications mu s t be in liquid form or crushed into a p o wder to prevent your feeding tube from getting clogged. Many medications come in a liquid form. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about liquid forms if you take pills, tablets, or capsules. Enteric-coated, extended-release XR , or slow-release SR tablets or capsules cannot be given through your feeding tube.

If you take any medications in that form, ask your doctor or pharmacist if you can get the medication in a different form. Do n o t mix different medications to g e ther unless in s tructed b y your doctor or pharmaci s t. Some medications have to be taken on an empty stomach while others must be taken with food.

Talk with your doctor about how to take your medications. Write down your medication schedule and keep it readily available. Update it when anything changes. That will make it easy for your family members or caregivers to know your medication schedule. Bring a copy of the schedule to your doctor visits. Your doctor will want to review your medications at each visit. Always flush your feeding tube with 30 to 60 mL of water before and after you take each medication.

This will pre v ent clogging. Keeping a diary can help you keep track of any problems or questions you may have. It will also help you remember what has been going on at home if you need to come to the hospital.

In your diary:. If you have bloating, nausea, stomach cramps, or diarrhea:. Your case manager will check with your insurance company about your insurance coverage. If your insurance covers tube feedings, we will refer you to a home care provider.

They will supply you with formula and equipment. Always reorder formula and equipment when you have only 10 days of supplies at home. If you have any questions or concerns, call the Nutrition Service office at and ask for the outpatient NP. You can reach the office Monday through Friday from am to pm. After pm , during weekend, and on holidays, please call and ask for the gastrointestinal GI fellow on call.

Skip to main content This information will help teach you how to use the bolus method to feed yourself and take your medications through your percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy PEG , gastrostomy tube GT , or nasogastric tube NGT. Back to top Arrow up icon.

Tube Feeding Schedule You can choose the times of your feedings, as long as you reach your daily nutritional goals. Tube Feeding Position Sit up in a chair during your tube feeding. Figure 1. Sitting up at a degree angle Sit or stand in an upright position for 1 hour after the feeding is finished. Tube Feeding Instructions Clean your hands.

Dry your hands with a towel and use that same towel to turn off the faucet. Gather your supplies in a clean and comfortable place. You will need: The amount of formula prescribed by your doctor or NP An empty container A cup A clean cloth or paper towel A container of water. A 60 mL catheter tip syringe Tape A button adapter, if you have a button see Figure 2 instead of a tube see Figure 3 Figure 2.

Button Figure 3. Gastrostomy tube. Figure 4. Opening plug at end of feeding tube Figure 5. Inserting adapter into button. Figure 6. Drawing up the water into the syringe. Figure 7. Unclamping the feeding tube Figure 8.

Flushing the feeding tube. Figure 9. Drawing up the formula into the syringe. Tell us what you think Tell us what you think Your feedback will help us improve the information we provide to patients and caregivers.

What could we have explained better? Last Updated Friday, September 1, If you're a patient at MSK and you need to reach a provider after pm , during the weekend, or on a holiday, call Was this information easy to understand?

Mini-Bag plus. Patient stories. In the past, it was considered that the lower limit of body weight to insert PEG tubes should be 10 kg but PEG has been reported to be inserted safely in infants with a weight as low as 2. Connect tip on the end of pump set into feeding tube. Am Surg.

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education. Video Guides

.

Both bolus feedings and pump-assisted feedings are discussed. The video will show you a few lifestyle changes you may experience after you have had a feeding tube placed. It can seem like a lot of work and a little overwhelming at first, but once a working routine is developed, the benefits from a feeding tube may result in an improved lifestyle. Among some of the changes discussed are establishing new feeding habits, changes in sleep patterns, and day to day life.

In this video, you will see how those who require a feeding tube are still able to maintain a physically active lifestyle. Prior to the placement of the tube, it is not uncommon to question how your life may change. While there are added responsibilities of taking care of a feeding tube and maintaining a good routine, a little hard work can go a long way for incredible gains.

This video discusses some of the social questions and issues that may arise as a result of having a feeding tube. It is a noticeable device, and often people will need to overcome the appearance of the feeding tube.

It is a challenge that can be beaten, as here you will see how one person has thrived socially, athletically, and professionally despite his medical condition and the need for a feeding tube.

In this video, you will see how a feeding tube has made a difference over a several year timeframe. A person can remain on a feeding tube for as long or as short amount of time as needed.

Some people keep their feeding tubes for extended periods of time, allowing them to continue to receive their nutritional requirements and experience the benefits of both gaining and maintaining weight.

Further, you will see how the extra nutrition gives one person with a feeding tube an improvement in both energy and overall health. Nasogastric or ng tube The feeding tube passes through the nose,down the throat and esophagus and ends in the stomach. NasoIntestinal or ni tube The feeding tube passes through the nose, throat and esophagus, continues through the stomach, and ends in the first section of the small intestine.

Gastrostomy or g tube The feeding tube is inserted directly into in the stomach. Jejunostomy or j tube The feeding tube is surgically inserted into the jejunum, the middle section of the small intestine. Follow the specific instructions provided by your health care provider, as these are based on the location of your tube.

The content you are trying to access is intended for healthcare professionals only. YES NO. The content you are about to view is intended for consumers. You are being redirected. The content you are about to view is intended for healthcare professionals. Adults Kids. Video Guides. Normalcy with the Feeding Tube. Comfort with your Feeding Tube. Success with the Feeding Tube. Tube Feeding with a Syringe Bolus.

Supplies Clean measuring cup with pour spout Formula room temperature Syringe 60 mL Water room temperature Preparation Wash hands thoroughly. Rinse the top of the formula container with hot water or wipe with clean wet paper towel. Shake formula container well before opening. Use syringe to flush feeding tube with water, as directed, by your healthcare professional.

Pour formula into clean measuring cup or directly into the syringe. Administration Sit or lie with your head elevated at least 30 degrees about the height of two pillows and remain in this position for 30 to 60 minutes after each feeding to help prevent nausea or reflux. Open unclamp or uncap feeding tube.

Fill syringe with formula and attach to feeding tube. Release feeding tube to allow formula to flow. Raise or lower height of syringe to increase or decrease flow feeding rate. After feeding, use syringe to flush feeding tube with water, as directed by your healthcare professional. Detach syringe from feeding tube and close reclamp or recap feeding tube. Tube Feeding by Gravity. Supplies Feeding container and tubing gravity set Formula room temperature Pole Syringe 60 mL Water room temperature Preparation Wash hands thoroughly.

Use syringe to flush feeding tube with water, as directed by your healthcare professional. Pour formula into feeding container and close cap. Hang feeding container on pole so it is at least 18 inches above stomach. If using a pre-filled feeding container, shake and connect as directed.

Open clamp on flow regulator until the formula fills the tubing. Close clamp on the flow regulator. Make sure drip chamber on the tubing is about half full. Administration Sit or lie with head elevated at least 30 degrees about the height of two pillows and remain in this position for 30 to 60 minutes after each feeding to help prevent nausea or reflux. Connect tip on the end of gravity set into feeding tube.

Open flow regulator clamp to adjust flow rate, as directed by your healthcare professional. After feeding, close and disconnect gravity set from feeding tube. Use syringe to flush feeding tube with water, as directed. Close reclamp or recap feeding tube. Supplies Enteral feeding pump Feeding container and tubing pump set Formula room temperature Pole Syringe 60 mL Water room temperature Preparation Wash hands thoroughly.

Follow instructions provided to set up and operate pump. Connect tip on the end of pump set into feeding tube. If applicable, open roller clamp on pump set. Start the pump. After feeding, disconnect pump set from feeding tube and recap end of pump set. Personal Care and Hygiene.

Follow any other special instructions from your healthcare professionals. If you have a gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube, care of the skin surrounding the feeding site is very important. Mouth: Brush teeth, gums, and tongue at least two times a day using toothpaste and a soft toothbrush. To moisten mouth, if allowed, use ice chips, hard candies, or chewing gum.

Freshen mouth and breathe by using mouthwash. To moisten lips, use lip balm or lanolin-based moisturizing cream. To prevent chapping, avoid licking lips. Report bleeding or anything unusual to your healthcare professional. Nose If you have a nasogastric or nasointestinal tube, it is important to take care of your nose as the tube may cause mild soreness or mucus in your nostrils.

On a daily basis, change tape holding feeding tube in place. When re-taping, allow some slack so the tube does not rub against nostrils.

Clean nostrils at least once a day with a soft washcloth or cotton swabs moistened with warm water. Remove sticky tape residue with a special adhesive remover.

Remove crusting on nostrils with warm water or on a cotton swab. Report any redness, bleeding, numbness or anything unusual to your healthcare professional. Tube Site If you have a gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube, care of the skin surrounding the feeding site is very important. Wash hands thoroughly. Cleanse the skin around the tube daily with soap and warm water as directed by your healthcare professional. Check the tube site every day for signs of redness, soreness, swelling, foul smelling odor, or unusual drainage.

Report anything unusual to your healthcare professional. Dry the skin around the feeding tube site thoroughly. Healed gastrostomy or jejunostomy sites usually do not need a special dressing. If a dressing is required, follow the instructions from your healthcare professional. Administering Medications. Medications may be needed to help keep your body healthy. The following provides directions for administering medication through your feeding tube. Use liquid medications whenever possible.

If using pills, crush medications into a very fine powder and dissolve in water. Check with your nurse, doctor, or pharmacist to get specific instructions on: How to crush medications How much water to mix with your medication Which medications should not be crushed Which medications should not be given together Medications that need special considerations when given through a feeding tube Even though your tube feeding formula contains water, extra water may be required for proper hydration and to prevent clogging of your feeding tube.

Instructions Using a 60 mL or larger syringe, rinse or flush feeding tube with mL of warm water before administering medication unless instructed otherwise by your healthcare professional. Do not force the water flush. Using a 60 mL or larger syringe, draw up correct dose of medication.

Open feeding tube and connect syringe into feeding tube. Gently push water and medication into tube. When administering water only, you may remove plunger from syringe and allow water to flow in by gravity.

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education

Tube feeding patient education