Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet-RadioQTH - Amateur Radio Phonetic Alphabet

For clear communications under all conditions, we use a phonetic alphabet for spelling out critical information. This alphabet is also referred to as the NATO or International Aviation alphabet, although the spelling of the words may change slightly. This is the phonetic alphabet that you should commit to memory for ham radio use. You will hear other phonetic alphabets used on the air from time to time. Some hams like to come up with something cute and easy to remember for their own callsign.

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. The Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet is used About womens health nurse practitioners the International Civil Aviation Organization for international aircraft communications. By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Archived PDF from the original on 16 February Five [Note Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet. Hidden categories: Webarchive template wayback links CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list Use dmy dates from October Wikipedia semi-protected pages Articles with short description Articles with hAudio microformats Articles needing additional references from February All Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet needing additional references All articles with unsourced statements Articles with unsourced statements from November Archived PDF from the original on 26 June Army Field Manuals in the series.

Sex with friend mom. Phonetic Alphabet

Retrieved 28 January At this point a variety of nations used their own spelling or phonetic alphabets. Archive 1. On any two way radio communication link or for other forms of voice telecommunications, the audio bandwidth is limited and interference and distortion may be present. Using non-standard phonetics can sometimes be confused for other meanings. These codes were originally developed to shorten transmission times when using CW, Beach teen candidate pictures are frequently Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet in voice transmissions. Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet to Top Having Trouble? The Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet is used by the International Civil Aviation Organization for international aircraft communications. Retrieved 23 January Leaving the air or closing the station CL Indicates that a station is going off the air, and will not listen or answer any further calls.

The Phonetic Alphabet is used to identify callsign letters in place of just saying the letter itself.

  • A number of phonetic alphabets exist.
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  • The entire message should be repeated at least four times B.

Although often called "phonetic alphabets", spelling alphabets are unrelated to phonetic transcription systems such as the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Strict adherence to the prescribed spelling words—including the apparently misspelled "Alfa" and "Juliett"—is required in order to avoid the problems of confusion that the spelling alphabet is designed to overcome.

As noted in a NATO memo:. One of the firmest conclusions reached was that it was not practical to make an isolated change to clear confusion between one pair of letters. To change one word involves reconsideration of the whole alphabet to ensure that the change proposed to clear one confusion does not itself introduce others. The same alphabetic code words are used by all agencies, but each agency chooses one of two different sets of numeric code words.

In practice these are used very rarely, as they frequently result in confusion between speakers of different languages. A spelling alphabet is used to spell parts of a message containing letters and numbers to avoid confusion, because many letters sound similar, for instance "n" and "m" or "f" and "s"; the potential for confusion increases if static or other interference is present.

For instance the message "proceed to map grid DH98" could be transmitted as "proceed to map grid Delta-Hotel-Niner-Ait". The unusual pronunciation of certain numbers was designed to reduce confusion as well. In addition to the traditional military usage, civilian industry uses the alphabet to avoid similar problems in the transmission of messages by telephone systems.

For example, it is often used in the retail industry where customer or site details are spoken by telephone to authorize a credit agreement or confirm stock codes , although ad-hoc coding is often used in that instance.

It is often used in a medical context as well, to avoid confusion when transmitting information. During the Vietnam War , the U. The final choice of code words for the letters of the alphabet and for the digits was made after hundreds of thousands of comprehension tests involving 31 nationalities. The qualifying feature was the likelihood of a code word being understood in the context of others.

For example, football has a higher chance of being understood than foxtrot in isolation, but foxtrot is superior in extended communication. The pronunciation of the code words varies according to the language habits of the speaker.

To eliminate wide variations in pronunciation, recordings and posters illustrating the pronunciation desired by the ICAO are available.

Also, although all codes for the letters of the alphabet are English words, they are not in general given English pronunciations. Pronunciations are somewhat uncertain because the agencies, while ostensibly using the same pronunciations, give different transcriptions, which are often inconsistent from letter to letter. ATIS gives English spellings, but does not give pronunciations or numbers. The pronunciation of the digits 3, 4, 5, and 9 differs from standard English — being pronounced tree , fower , fife , and niner.

The digit 3 is specified as tree so that it is not pronounced sri ; the long pronunciation of 4 still found in some English dialects keeps it somewhat distinct from for ; 5 is pronounced with a second "f" because the normal pronunciation with a "v" is easily confused with "fire" a command to shoot ; and 9 has an extra syllable to keep it distinct from German nein 'no'. Both the IPA and respelled pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before with advice from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom, [16] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents.

Prior to World War I and the development and widespread adoption of two-way radio that supported voice, telephone spelling alphabets were developed to improve communication on low-quality and long-distance telephone circuits.

The experience gained with that alphabet resulted in several changes being made during by the ITU. Throughout World War II, many nations used their own versions of a spelling alphabet. The U. At least two of the terms are sometimes still used by UK civilians to spell words over the phone, namely F for Freddie and S for Sugar.

To enable the U. The CCB alphabet itself was based on the U. Army Field Manuals in the series. Several of these documents had revisions, and were renamed. Major F. According to a report on the subject:. In a few instances where none of the words could be regarded as especially satisfactory, it was believed possible to discover suitable replacements. After World War II, with many aircraft and ground personnel from the allied armed forces, "Able Baker" was officially adopted for use in international aviation.

But many sounds were unique to English, so an alternative "Ana Brazil" alphabet was used in Latin America. After further study and modification by each approving body, the revised alphabet was adopted on 1 November , to become effective on 1 April for civil aviation but it may not have been adopted by any military. Problems were soon found with this list.

Some users believed that they were so severe that they reverted to the old "Able Baker" alphabet. Confusion among words like Delta and Extra , and between Nectar and Victor , or the unintelligibility of other words during poor receiving conditions were the main problems. Later in , ICAO decided to revisit the alphabet and their research. To identify the deficiencies of the new alphabet, testing was conducted among speakers from 31 nations, principally by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States.

By early the ICAO was nearly complete with this research, and published the new official phonetic alphabet in order to account for discrepancies that might arise in communications as a result of multiple alphabet naming systems coexisting in different places and organizations.

Air Force research. After all of the above study, only the five words representing the letters C, M, N, U, and X were replaced. It was finally adopted by the IMO in In the official version of the alphabet, [1] the non-English spellings Alfa and Juliett are used.

Juliett is spelled with a tt for French speakers, because they may otherwise treat a single final t as silent. In some English versions of the alphabet, one or both of these may have their standard English spelling.

For the and phonetics, each transmission of figures is preceded and followed by the words "as a number" spoken twice. The ITU adopted the International Maritime Organization 's phonetic spelling alphabet in , [43] and in specified that it be "for application in the maritime mobile service only". Pronunciation was not defined prior to For the — present phonetics, the underlined syllable of each letter word should be emphasized, and each syllable of the code words for the figures — present should be equally emphasized.

The Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet is used by the International Civil Aviation Organization for international aircraft communications. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This is the latest accepted revision , reviewed on 23 October ICAO phonetic alphabet. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. International Civil Aviation Organization. Archived from the original on 20 June Retrieved 2 July Archived PDF from the original on 12 April National Communications System.

Archived from the original on 13 March Retrieved 30 January Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions. Archived from the original on 31 January Archived PDF from the original on 3 October Archived from the original on 6 March Retrieved 22 August Archived from the original on 12 February Retrieved 23 January Archived from the original on 29 January Archived PDF from the original on 7 November Retrieved 31 October Federal Aviation Administration.

Archived from the original on 12 October Archived from the original on 22 August Retrieved 11 August Archived from the original on 16 May Indiana University. Archived from the original on 7 May Retrieved 7 May Archived from the original on 26 June October Archived PDF from the original on 31 March Archived PDF from the original on 27 February Archived from the original on 2 August Archived PDF from the original on 24 September Archived PDF from the original on 10 March Retrieved 1 November Archived from the original on 30 October Archived from the original on 31 March Washington: International Radiotelegraph Convention.

Madrid: International Telecommunication Union.

In addition to the traditional military usage, civilian industry uses the alphabet to avoid similar problems in the transmission of messages by telephone systems. This can still be heard sometimes on the amateur radio bands to this day. The same alphabetic code words are used by all agencies, but each agency chooses one of two different sets of numeric code words. Even those which may sound very different could be mistaken if signals are poor and interference levels are high To overcome this words beginning with the particular letter were used from the very earliest days of radio to identify a particular letter and avoid confusion and misinterpretation. For example, it is often used in the retail industry where customer or site details are spoken by telephone to authorize a credit agreement or confirm stock codes , although ad-hoc coding is often used in that instance. Geneva: International Telecommunication Union.

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet

Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet. Introduction

To eliminate wide variations in pronunciation, recordings and posters illustrating the pronunciation desired by the ICAO are available.

Also, although all codes for the letters of the alphabet are English words, they are not in general given English pronunciations. Pronunciations are somewhat uncertain because the agencies, while ostensibly using the same pronunciations, give different transcriptions, which are often inconsistent from letter to letter. ATIS gives English spellings, but does not give pronunciations or numbers.

The pronunciation of the digits 3, 4, 5, and 9 differs from standard English — being pronounced tree , fower , fife , and niner. The digit 3 is specified as tree so that it is not pronounced sri ; the long pronunciation of 4 still found in some English dialects keeps it somewhat distinct from for ; 5 is pronounced with a second "f" because the normal pronunciation with a "v" is easily confused with "fire" a command to shoot ; and 9 has an extra syllable to keep it distinct from German nein 'no'.

Both the IPA and respelled pronunciations were developed by the ICAO before with advice from the governments of both the United States and United Kingdom, [16] so the pronunciations of both General American English and British Received Pronunciation are evident, especially in the rhotic and non-rhotic accents.

Prior to World War I and the development and widespread adoption of two-way radio that supported voice, telephone spelling alphabets were developed to improve communication on low-quality and long-distance telephone circuits.

The experience gained with that alphabet resulted in several changes being made during by the ITU. Throughout World War II, many nations used their own versions of a spelling alphabet. The U. At least two of the terms are sometimes still used by UK civilians to spell words over the phone, namely F for Freddie and S for Sugar. To enable the U. The CCB alphabet itself was based on the U. Army Field Manuals in the series. Several of these documents had revisions, and were renamed.

Major F. According to a report on the subject:. In a few instances where none of the words could be regarded as especially satisfactory, it was believed possible to discover suitable replacements. After World War II, with many aircraft and ground personnel from the allied armed forces, "Able Baker" was officially adopted for use in international aviation. But many sounds were unique to English, so an alternative "Ana Brazil" alphabet was used in Latin America.

After further study and modification by each approving body, the revised alphabet was adopted on 1 November , to become effective on 1 April for civil aviation but it may not have been adopted by any military. Problems were soon found with this list. Some users believed that they were so severe that they reverted to the old "Able Baker" alphabet. Confusion among words like Delta and Extra , and between Nectar and Victor , or the unintelligibility of other words during poor receiving conditions were the main problems.

Later in , ICAO decided to revisit the alphabet and their research. To identify the deficiencies of the new alphabet, testing was conducted among speakers from 31 nations, principally by the governments of the United Kingdom and the United States. By early the ICAO was nearly complete with this research, and published the new official phonetic alphabet in order to account for discrepancies that might arise in communications as a result of multiple alphabet naming systems coexisting in different places and organizations.

Air Force research. After all of the above study, only the five words representing the letters C, M, N, U, and X were replaced. It was finally adopted by the IMO in In the official version of the alphabet, [1] the non-English spellings Alfa and Juliett are used. Juliett is spelled with a tt for French speakers, because they may otherwise treat a single final t as silent. In some English versions of the alphabet, one or both of these may have their standard English spelling.

For the and phonetics, each transmission of figures is preceded and followed by the words "as a number" spoken twice. The ITU adopted the International Maritime Organization 's phonetic spelling alphabet in , [43] and in specified that it be "for application in the maritime mobile service only". Pronunciation was not defined prior to For the — present phonetics, the underlined syllable of each letter word should be emphasized, and each syllable of the code words for the figures — present should be equally emphasized.

The Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet is used by the International Civil Aviation Organization for international aircraft communications.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This is the latest accepted revision , reviewed on 23 October ICAO phonetic alphabet. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. International Civil Aviation Organization.

Archived from the original on 20 June Retrieved 2 July Archived PDF from the original on 12 April National Communications System. Archived from the original on 13 March Retrieved 30 January Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions. Archived from the original on 31 January Archived PDF from the original on 3 October Archived from the original on 6 March Retrieved 22 August Archived from the original on 12 February Retrieved 23 January Archived from the original on 29 January Archived PDF from the original on 7 November Retrieved 31 October Federal Aviation Administration.

Archived from the original on 12 October Archived from the original on 22 August Retrieved 11 August Archived from the original on 16 May Indiana University. Archived from the original on 7 May Retrieved 7 May These are referred to as "cut numbers" and are obtained by replacing all of the dashes in a CW digit with a single dash.

Cut numbers are not suitable for transmitting data which already contains mixed alphanumerics, such as callsigns. These abbreviations are commonly used in CW transmissions to shorten transmission times. In , Western Union standardized on the "92 code", a series of telegraphic abbreviations in which numbers originally 1 to 92 were assigned meanings.

Two non-standard codes, rarely-used, were coined within the amateur radiotelegraph service. Jump to: navigation , search. Personal tools Log in. A non-standard call proposed by ARRL for land-based or railroad emergency traffic in situations where response from ships at sea which listened for SOS was neither needed nor desired. Operating procedures. Trail-Friendly Radio.

Phonetic Alphabets | Ham Radio cherrycitykitties.com

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Amateur Radio Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for amateur radio enthusiasts. It only takes a minute to sign up. The choice of using phonetics 'alpha, bravo, charlie, …' versus plain alphabet sounds 'aye, bee, see, …' should be, and in my limited experience usually is, made based on how likely the recipient is to need them to understand.

On the other hand, someone calling CQ on simplex using SSB either for a contest or DXing will always use phonetics, because they're trying to call anyone they can, particularly operators at the longest possible range, and so they want to maximize understandability when the recipient hears lots of noise and has never heard this particular call sign before.

And so on. The reason is simple - when you are establishing a QSO you don't know how well the other operator hears you.

During an established QSO phonetic alphabet is used by two reasons. Firstly, you make sure that the other operator received your call sign correctly. I've been in a few situations when my suffix was recorded wrong e. Repeating your call sign is a polite way to say that it should be corrected. Secondly, all other hams may hear you as well, but you don't know how well they hear you.

They may even hear only one of two hams. Repeating call signs using phonetic alphabet allows to specify who is talking and who she is talking to. By the way very important! During the QSO hams use two call signs - the first one is who you are taling to, and the second is your call sign, always in this order.

The obvious exception is when you are calling CQ. This being said, during a long and stable QSO hams may get tired of repeating their call signs using phonetic alphabet all the time and start using regular letters, or even pronounce the call signs as if they were words. Yes, the standard phonetic alphabet is used by radio amateurs. Of course, some people use alternatives in some circumstances - but we are required to know the standard phonetic alphabet.

Episode of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Is it conventional to sign using the phonetic alphabet like people do in the military or aviation? Ask Question. Asked 9 months ago. Active 9 months ago.

Viewed 2k times. Kilo zulu 1 X-ray X-ray Yankee. HeavenlyHarmony HeavenlyHarmony 12 12 bronze badges. Friends teased that it was Juvenlie Kissing Bandit, but I digress. The bottom line is to try to avoid having someone ask, "What's your call again? You're free to choose any method that's likely to be understood.

It used to say "Use of a standard phonetic alphabet", but that was changed. You can use whatever phonetics necessary to make the ID clear. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password. Post as a guest Name. Email Required, but never shown. Featured on Meta. Feedback post: Moderator review and reinstatement processes. Post for clarifications on the updated pronouns FAQ.

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Amateur radio phoenetic alphabet