Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed-Sexual Assault and Mental Health | Mental Health America

People living with mental health conditions are people. They have people they love, activities they enjoy, and dreams for their lives. As people, they deserve to be treated with dignity, and under the law they have rights and protections. From leaving people to languish in overcrowded state hospitals to lobotomies and forced sterilization, the treatment of those with mental health conditions is a dark stain on our history as a nation. While we have come a long way, abuse and discrimination continue to be serious problems today.

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

A common barrier for victimized individuals when reporting offences is the fear diturbed retaliation. Include "harassment that adversely affects the worker's psychological well-being. Employers You may think that your employer needs to know about your mental illness. Search for services and support groups in your local area using distuebed postcode or town. This does not include addiction caused by medical treatment, such as addictive drugs prescribed by a doctor, starting fires, physically or sexually abusing other people, exposing private parts of your body in public, known as exhibitionism, watching people who are carrying Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed intimate acts, known as voyeurism, stealing, Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed, and a disfigurement caused by tattoo or piercing. A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Discrimination is when garrassment person is treated unfairly because the person has a certain characteristic. It can be hard to prove direct discrimination. The tribunal will sometimes award you compensation. This could be a failure to provide reasonable adjustments.

Custom fit nursing uniforms. Further support managers and staff

I agree with Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed who are avoiding women, making sure their interactions are witnesses or recorded, or just hiring Trading nude pics with people women in general. December 11, at pm. Again, I feel for you, and I bet they do too, but they're unlikely to have the legal leverage to make that happen. Your comments seem to be aimed at all men rather than the select few who are actually guilty of it. If she seems to be a danger to herself or others, the police can take her to a hospital for an emergency evaluation. I say just completely avoid Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed them if you can, and if you DO hire them, avoid any interaction as much as you can. Keep calling the landlord to complain whenever absolutely anything happens. Get out now. They confronted her, on our doorstep, and told her to get back on her medication. Oh, and you can try to get a restraining order but if you live in an Ava cummings building it might make things tricky.

Acas uses cookies to ensure we give you the best experience and to make the site simpler.

  • I'll be watching you.
  • Remember Me?

People living with mental health conditions are people. They have people they love, activities they enjoy, and dreams for their lives. As people, they deserve to be treated with dignity, and under the law they have rights and protections. From leaving people to languish in overcrowded state hospitals to lobotomies and forced sterilization, the treatment of those with mental health conditions is a dark stain on our history as a nation. While we have come a long way, abuse and discrimination continue to be serious problems today.

The shackling or restraining of children, keeping people out of work, and denying access to services are just a few examples of the way we continue to fail the 1 in 5 Americans that has a diagnosable mental health disorder. This is not just a small issue for a small group of people: half of all Americans will experience a diagnosable mental health condition in their lifetime. If it is not us being directly impacted, it is likely that it will be our family members, friends, or loved ones-- whether we know it or not.

Beyond struggles in education or employment, we see the loss of human dignity and even human life for the people we love and care about when we do not work to address abuses in the system.

For Mental Health America, the fight against abuse and discrimination is essential to our history and continues to guide our work. As an organization, MHA is committed to the principles of human and civil rights inherent to the concept of equal justice under the law.

This includes the rights of persons with mental health and substance use conditions to:. People living with mental health conditions have the right to make decisions about their lives, including their treatment.

Just as all Americans, they should be assumed competent to make their own decisions, and a refusal of any type of treatment should not be considered evidence that a person is incompetent. A person's preferences, like those referenced in a psychiatric advanced directive , should be followed and all effort should be made to engage individuals in voluntary services. In rare cases where an individual is considered an imminent danger to self or others, he or she has the right to due process, adequate representation, and appeals should there be civil commitment or involuntary treatment procedures.

MHA calls for the following policy changes:. People living with mental health conditions have the right to be free from all abuses, including the practices of seclusion and restraint. Shackling, physical restraints, chemical restraints, and seclusion are among the practices used in schools and treatment facilities and throughout the criminal justice system.

These practices represent failures in treatment, have no therapeutic value, and expose individuals to added trauma. Seclusion and restraint also play a role in many interactions with law enforcement, where some estimate about half of those killed by police officers has a mental illness. MHA calls for the ultimate abolition of seclusion and restraint and encourages providers, teachers, law enforcement, and consumers to work together to plan alternatives and create cultures that do not use seclusion and restraint.

People living with mental health conditions have the right to live and fully participate in their communities of choice. From denying someone an apartment to kicking kids out of schools, discrimination against people living with mental health conditions often occurs in areas like housing, employment, and education.

Community inclusion means not only addressing discriminatory practices that exist but also providing necessary supports that allow people to live and find meaningful roles in their communities. In order to best serve the people they aim to help, services should be driven by wants and experiences of consumers to include things like peer support and self-help tools that fight isolation and promote recovery.

MHA calls for the following policy change:. People living with mental health conditions have the right to receive the services they want, how and where they want them, with full explanation of insurance benefits, treatment options, and side effects. Insurance plans should provide a full explanation of services covered and implement mental health parity, which means providing coverage for mental health related services comparable to those offered for physical health services.

This includes making sure people have choices in both services and providers with access to necessary and effective treatment options. Informed consent and culturally and linguistically competent services empower people to make the best decisions for their health and well-being.

People living with mental health conditions have the right to privacy and to manage who can see their healthcare information. This includes controlling who sees their health information and the ability to access and supplement their mental health records. Health plans and providers should provide information about privacy and confidentiality protocols. For example, many mental health professionals are required to report child abuse; therefore, an individual should know prior to engaging in treatment that any disclosure of child abuse may potentially result in a report to respective authorities.

Information about privacy and information sharing should be given when a person joins a health plan or begins treatment with a new clinician and should be available on an ongoing basis, with the ability to withdraw, narrow, or otherwise modify terms of consent for what is to be shared.

Mental Health Rights Breadcrumb Home. Mental Health Rights People living with mental health conditions are people. Liberty and Autonomy People living with mental health conditions have the right to make decisions about their lives, including their treatment. MHA urges states to create and enforce laws which permit persons with mental illnesses to designate in writing, while competent, what treatment they should receive should their decisional capacity be impaired at a later date.

There are a growing number of effective treatments for mental health conditions, including psychotropic medications. However, all medications pose some risks and many pose quite serious risks to the health of the persons who take them, particularly when medications are taken for extended periods to treat chronic illnesses. For this reason and because of its commitment to the autonomy and dignity of persons with mental health conditions, MHA strongly agrees that all persons, even persons lawfully convicted and serving a sentence of imprisonment, have a right to refuse medication and that medication may not be imposed involuntarily unless rigorous standards and procedures are met.

Coercion occurs during many so-called "voluntary" admissions. Z inermon v. Persons facing involuntary commitment are routinely offered the option of becoming voluntary patients.

However, in many treatment facilities, a person who has been voluntarily admitted is not free to leave when she or he chooses. Rather, it is common for mental health laws to permit the facility to detain a person for up to one week after she indicates a desire to leave.

MHA urges states to eliminate this form of admission and admit persons to mental health facilities in the same manner as persons are admitted to medical treatment facilities for non-psychiatric illnesses. Seclusion and Restraint People living with mental health conditions have the right to be free from all abuses, including the practices of seclusion and restraint. Engaging consumers in this activity should take place immediately upon admission or at the next clinically appropriate time because a disproportionately large number of seclusion and restraint events take place in the first few days after a person is admitted to a psychiatric facility.

These trainings should take place when staff are first hired and continually at regular intervals. Only staff persons who have received this training should be involved in seclusion or restraint of consumers. To reduce and ultimately eliminate the use of seclusion and restraints, the federal government and the states should drastically improve the mechanisms currently available to monitor these activities and the harm caused by them to mental health consumers.

As one step to improve monitoring of the use and abuse of seclusion and restraints, MHA calls on the states to publish on their websites data on the use of seclusion and restraints including the number of hours spent in restraint for each public facility and private facility contracting with the state as well as data on any injuries or deaths associated with the use of seclusion and restraint and diversion to correctional facilities.

Community Inclusion People living with mental health conditions have the right to live and fully participate in their communities of choice.

MHA is committed to protecting the gains made under the ADA in reforming state mental health systems. MHA and its affiliates should likewise support proactive legislation in all states to advance community inclusion and integration of services, without waiting for courts to compel states to take action.

MHA and its affiliates should ensure that community inclusion is promoted and measured as an outcome by providers, peers, and administrators of mental health care systems. Access to Services People living with mental health conditions have the right to receive the services they want, how and where they want them, with full explanation of insurance benefits, treatment options, and side effects.

MHA supports the right to access medically necessary and effective medication without being subjected to "fail first" policies, discriminatory or excessive co-payments, or time-consuming prior authorization and paperwork processes.

Advocates should help individuals appeal denials and work to change discriminatory policies that keep people from accessing the services they want and need. Privacy People living with mental health conditions have the right to privacy and to manage who can see their healthcare information.

MHA calls for the following policy changes: For court orders authorizing disclosure of confidential information for other than criminal purposes, HIPAA requires that the consumer receive formal notice of the request and an opportunity to respond but does not set a standard, which is left to state law.

HIPAA requires that the order limit disclosure to information essential to the demonstrated purpose and provide protection against future public scrutiny, such as by sealing court records. Examples of "super-confidential" information include: genetic information and information pertaining to school records, substance abuse, mental health conditions, HIV testing, and sexually transmitted diseases, as defined and protected by specific federal and state laws and regulations.

Individuals should have the right to release HIPAA-protected information to their designated healthcare proxies and in their psychiatric advance directives, and should routinely do so. State law presumptions could help consumers to avoid HIPAA impediments to sharing information as they wish. View All Policy Issues and Statements.

Replies: 3 Last Post: , PM. Btw there is no unconscious bias, unless you speak in your sleep. Given that, I would begin negotiations with your landlord to prematurely terminate your lease. Ideally, a family member would be notified, so that person can help her get the help she needs. I agree with men who are avoiding women, making sure their interactions are witnesses or recorded, or just hiring fewer women in general.

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed. 1. Leadership Commitment

She is pleading insanity on both charges. The past year we have seen a pattern of harassment and threats of violence. We video tape all interactions. The latest incident showed her throwing something at us and screaming at our family. She was visibly drunk and was taken to the mental health facility again We were granted an emergency CPO. We thought that would stop her harrasment. One day passed after being served the CPO. She has now begun to call the police and falsify information.

Claiming we are ringing her doorbell and our children were throwing things at her house. Both times were complete lies. My children are very young and terrified of her, they would never go near her. I fully understand the CPO and I avoid her at all costs. I believe she is using the police as a means to harass us.

Twice they arrived to question us about these false accusations. The police are sometimes appologetic, sometimes accusatory. As if we are causing the harrasment. Is there anything to be done? Because she doesn't do anything criminal, she falls into this grey area, where no one will do anything about her. We would love to move. In the mean time we are prisoners in our home.

And even if she's forced out of the apartment, she still knows where you live. A restraining order might not do much to stop a mentally disturbed person who can't understand its purpose. This will be especially true since she'll essentially be barred from setting foot on a portion of her own turf -- her building. That would be another escalation that a she wouldn't understand and probably couldn't stick with, and b would make her think you're out to get her.

I totally understand your frustration, but I think your best course of action second only to consulting attorneys familiar with housing AND mental health issues is to keep pestering the landlord. It's HIS responsibility. Oh, and you can try to get a restraining order but if you live in an apartment building it might make things tricky. From what I understand, judge's aren't usually willing to sign an order that would make a person homeless if they complied with it.

You can bring this question to the officer on desk duty at your local precinct when you meet with them. First of all, I feel for everyone in this situation. It seems like there is no correct answer - no matter what happens, someone loses. Having been on the landlord side of this one, I do know anything that leads to your neighbor being back on her meds is a good thing.

But here's the catch - even if she goes back on her meds, she'll go off them again and the situation will start up all over again. It is likely her disease has progressed to the point where she might be better off in some type of supervised or semi-supervised environment.

I'm sure the threats are frightening, and I'm sure you realize the other side of this situation is that your neighbor is suffering. Your landlord probably just doesn't know how to handle all this. The bottom line is that the longer she remains in her apartment living alone, the worse her behavior will become. Sooner or later your landlord will have to confront the situation and take decisive action, but I can tell from his actions thus far, it won't be soon enough to improve your situation or assure your safety.

Sadly, it is time for you and your wife to make other arrangements and move to a new place. I will be happy to discuss my experiences with this situation at length via email.

As metafilter members we can get in touch with each other via this site - yes? Life is short. Go do that: posted by jbenben at AM on June 17, [ 4 favorites ].

The thing is that the landlord is following procedure. Put yourself in his shoes for a moment--he's risking all kinds of exposure, to both a civil lawsuit and perhaps action by the city, if he evicts someone who's mentally ill without due process. If she's disorganized enough to behave like this in front of police, she's probably too disorganized to follow you to your new apartment. Here's what the landlord isn't going to do: evict the woman.

I feel for you, and I bet he does too, but the bottom line is that that's too risky for him. Here's what the police aren't going to do: involuntarily commit the woman. Again, I feel for you, and I bet they do too, but they're unlikely to have the legal leverage to make that happen.

So given that those two options are off the table, the question for you is this: what kind of outcome do you want? Do you want out of your lease, and to have the landlord pay for your moving expenses?

I bet you can negotiate that. Do you want a new apartment in the building, with moving expenses paid for by the landlord? I'd also insist on a month's free rent in compensation for your inconvenience. I agree with jbenben -- you can't fix this situation, so the best course of action is probably to distance yourself as far from it as possible. Moving sucks, but getting away from this sounds like it'll be worth it.

I tried to find some info about Chicago's services for people in a mental health crisis, but the city's website didn't have anything that looked familiar to me. Chicago does have a system, however, and I suggest you call them. I would be surprised if Chicago didn't have something like New York's Adult Protective Services city agency and mobile crisis teams city-funded units at hospitals , which assess people like your neighbor. This page looks like it could have some useful phone numbers.

Finally, you might try going to your local precinct and talking to someone there about your problem. If she seems to be a danger to herself or others, the police can take her to a hospital for an emergency evaluation. You need to move. If she thinks you're harming her just by living next door, can you imagine the shitstorm that will rain down on you if you've actually accomplished an eviction?

I do not know schizophrenic behavior well enough to know, with people such as your neighbor, how often they actually carry through with the threats they make.

My first reaction was predicated upon the concept that if she says she is going to do something, she will do it, and for all I know, that may not be the truth, or even common.

Then again, perhaps it is. My initial reaction was an urgent, immediate statement that you and your wife's life is in danger and you need to treat this an emergency situation.

I still feel that this is a strong possibility — in fact, so strong of a possibility that, for safety's sake, your behavior should now be predicated on that assumption, that she is a mortal danger to your lives. From what your post describes, she has held a belief for eight months that you and your wife are maliciously acting upon her, and, beginning three days ago, the frequency of her confrontations stepped up to daily confrontations.

That makes me fear that she is escalating to something. She has repeatedly threatened to kill you and your wife, and three days ago warned you that there would be "penalties" for you bringing the cops and landlord in to attempt to resolve this. In September, we had a person who asked Ask Metafilter about how she could handle her boyfriend's suicide by self-immolation. A lot of people gave her advice. She chose to take her own life two months later. To me, your question mirrors her situation, because I honestly fear — based on my non-psychologically-expert layman's opinion — that the circumstances surrounding your Ask Metafilter question, just like the circumstances surrounding hers, may lead to your death.

As such, I would very strongly urge you to treat this situation as you would a life-threatening one. I believe again, speaking from a position of no legal expertise that this is a situation where, were your landlord to haul you into court to try to recoup costs from a broken lease, you would win.

I would move to a whole other apartment building. Alternatively, I would pack a bag with a week's worth of clothes and necessities and leave the apartment, taking shelter with any local friends I knew, and then proceed to begin a campaign of absolutely holy flipping hell with the police, social services, and your landlord.

Perhaps this urgent response isn't the way to go. I must admit that I even find myself shaking a little bit as I type this, and from the tone of other responses here thus far, perhaps everything I've said is an overreaction and others will say so.

I nonetheless am greatly concerned for your welfare, and wish you safe passage through this ordeal. Sounds like a former neighbor of mine. The neighbor was evicted in short order.

We experienced no recrimination, but YMMV. Ask a lawyer if you can start withholding rent. The thing that strikes me is the possibility that, while she isn't mentally stable and she might be just And you're worried about it too. I don't know if evicting her is enough, really. She knows your address and likely, your names.

Doesn't mean if she was evicted, she wouldn't harass you from afar. For your own sake, you need to find out if she's become physical at any point or done this to other occupants past or present of the building. Start keeping records of each and every time you had to call the police, landlord, etc. And you know what? Yes, it's a pain in the ass to move. But what's better? Moving or living with harassment and death threats on a regular basis?

You need to get out of that building and not just in another apartment your landlord owns. Yeah, you have two real choices: Move out, or pressure your landlord into following through on dealing with the situation. Calling and putting up with a brushoff, which is what you've been doing if you let them get away with the whole "we'll mail it out in a couple days" shtick won't get it done. Tell them that so long as the situation goes on the apartment is not in a safe and liveable condition and they have two weeks to take care of it.

In writing. Just to echo what WCityMike said about the potential urgency of the situation, a crisis team once had to intervene on behalf of a schizophrenic roommate I once had. The extremely kind team members who came to our door couldn't get him services until the next morning, and begged me in no uncertain terms to not stay in the house with him alone that night, as they had seen people who were mentally ill do horrifyingly violent things because they weren't in their right minds.

I don't mean to paint all cases of schizophrenia with the same broad brush. And I know that moving is a royal pain in the ass.

But better safe than sorry? Give me her address. I can send her pictures of a ray gun and a note that says she needs to move out or I will use my ray gun. I will even leave one on her doorstep. All the energy and stress you are putting into this problem would be better directed into finding a better place and moving. You are dealing with a mentally ill person who could do harm to you or themselves or someone else.

But the person creating this problem is mentally ill and is not following those "rules". This is a no-win scenario for you. Get yourself out of it now. Schizophrenia can spike unpredictably at the best of times with potentially dangerous -- even potentially lethal -- consequences, and here it seems like there's a clear and sudden escalation of her behaviour.

She has repeatedly threatened to kill you and your wife This. It is very good to be compassionate towards people with problems, but death threats are serious business.

Did you explicitly tell the police that she has threatened to kill you? If not, you need to, and they need to take this seriously. Her eviction will not make this problem go away. This is already a tragic situation for this poor woman, don't let it be one for you too. Disclosure: years ago a friend of my sister's was murdered by a schizophrenic whose threats were ignored, so I may have a biased "worst case scenario" take on this situation. Exactly -- you wouldn't ignore "death threats" from a sane person -- why would you ignore them from a mentally ill person?

This woman is having a medical crisis. Ideally, a family member would be notified, so that person can help her get the help she needs. Nthing that you need to move if at all possible. They fought us, over a small matter of several hundred dollars we didn't owe them.

We took a principled stand, found an inexpensive but VERY helpful lawyer who stood up for us and our rights. Best of luck. I understand why you don't feel you should have to move - you're not doing anything wrong!

Please be careful. I'm with the people telling you to get out of there, asap. Another apartment in the same building is not gonna cut it, but does your landlord own other buildings? Heck, maybe your landlord owns other buildings in a better neighborhood, or with nicer amenities, or closer to the train? If finagling a great apartment isn't an option, you at the very least have grounds to terminate your lease without penalty. Get the fee-free termination in writing from your landlord, get your security deposit back in full, and get your last month's rent pro-rated if you don't stay the full month.

Also, get a glowing letter of recommendation from him, and see if he has any fellow-landlord buddies who will cut you a break as a favor. Your neighbor's situation is tragic but there's nothing you can do to help her. Get yourself out. If it were me, I would move. I know it's a pain in the ass, and you shouldn't have to be the one to move, but the police and your landlord haven't accomplished much, and it's getting worse not better.

I can't think of what a private attorney would do for you, other than if you wanted some help negotiating with your landlord about payment for moving expenses, etc I don't see a restraining order stopping her if she's unfazed by the police talking to her.

Admittedly I don't know this area of the law, but I don't see how you force her onto medication. I am not your lawyer. This New York Times article from about a decision of the state's highest court to uphold such a law says some forty states have this kind of law on the books. I imagine it is quite difficult to actually get a court to do this, though. I know that popular culture tends to ascribe scary violence to people with schizophrenia, but, in fact, their rate of violent behavior is only slightly elevated from the general population see May JAMA study.

The rate increases if the person has a comorbid substance abuse disorder. Do you have any reason to think your neighbor is taking drugs? It sounds like your neighbor is quite scared - it's a fairly common delusion to worry about being controlled by others and to try to fight back.

Certainly it might be wise to move if you think a violent event is coming up, or if her ongoing harassment it makes it too unpleasant to feel comfortable and safe at home.

But if you think you might stay, you might want to learn about schizophrenia - Torrey's book, Surviving Schizophrenia is a good place to start to learn. It would be worthwhile to talk to him, and your other neighbors about what kind of things this person did prior to your arrival on the scene. Your neighbor may have been this way for a really long time, in which case she may be kind of "stable" with periodic eruptions that are likely related to stressful changes.

Or the previous tenants may have left because they also felt unsafe or intruded upon by this person. Illinois does seem to have a law that allows the community to insist that people with mental illness get treatment.

We had a schizophrenic neighbor once, and it was much of the same story - his behavior on and off meds was really different. A bunch of neighbors got together without him and invited someone from the police station to come and meet with us.

Managing staff experiencing mental ill health | Acas

Sexual assault refers to sexual behavior that occurs without the clear consent of the victim. It's important to note that force does not just mean physical force, but includes manipulation, coercion, threats, and situations where a person is unable to give consent. Sexual assault can have a variety of short- and long-term effects on a victim's mental health.

Many survivors report flashbacks of their assault, and feelings of shame, isolation, shock, confusion, and guilt. People who were victims of rape or sexual assault are at an increased risk for developing:. Substance Use Disorders. Eating Disorders. Having a previous history of being a victim and negative reactions from family, friends, and professionals worsen the impact of sexual violence on mental health.

If you have concerns about your mental health, take a mental health screen. What is sexual assault? How common is sexual assault? People who were victims of rape or sexual assault are at an increased risk for developing: Depression PTSD Substance Use Disorders Eating Disorders Anxiety Having a previous history of being a victim and negative reactions from family, friends, and professionals worsen the impact of sexual violence on mental health.

Avoiding harrassment from mentally disturbed