Cartoon danish muslim strip-Jesus and Mo - Wikipedia

Printable version. A brief history of blasphemy book Regardless of all consequences: Abu Ghraib - images of abuse and the abuse of images You can talk: free speech and puritanism A brief history of blasphemy extract Liberalism's holy war Reconsidering the Rushdie affair The dark mirror of Islam Our common inhumanity: anti-semitism and history Life in the death camp The politics of the body Israel, Palestine and the tiger of terrorism: islamic anti-semitism and history Was Hitler a racist? Interestingly, however, Wilby goes on to note that contrary views were eventually expressed in the British press:. I hope he can sleep at night. The reference to Nick Cohen turned out to be a red herring.

Cartoon danish muslim strip

Cartoon danish muslim strip

Is this the thread you were referring to? The sceptical Cartoon danish muslim strip moderate view, meanwhile, is expressed by Ian Jack, once the editor of the Independent on Sundaynow the editor of Granta. Has there ever been stdip type of segregation that stems from the cartoon issue? Via television, newspapers, magazines, dxnish and the Internet, the publication of the cartoons and the wrath of offended Muslims were reported, the Cartoon danish muslim strip, cultural attitudes and immigration policies of Denmark, France and Europe in general Cartoon danish muslim strip explored, the religious doctrine and history of Islam were explained and debated, Danes were profiled, Muslims were analyzed, and opinions were expressed, ranging from the need for calm and patience to the need for righteous execution and dismemberment. Following a regular Dec. Some of them are immigrants from Pakistan and Somalia. Nor was there much outrage expressed initially Interracial mpg wife the Danish cartoons. Jesus will act as the author's mouthpiece if the comic Cartpon to criticise Islam while the character Mo will be used to criticise Christianity. I shall not set out daniah argument again here.

Maria owazi japan model. Navigation menu

Y Net News. Teasing Tempting Princess. Archived from the original on 10 October InterracialInterracial cartoonsInterracial cartoonCartoon interracial. Melbourne: The Age. Retrieved 10 January Four of the cartoons Celebritynipple slips Danish texts, one deliberately evades the issue and depicts a school child in Denmark named Muhammad rather than the Islamic prophetone is based on a Danish cultural expression, and one includes a Danish politician. A spokesman for al-Shabab, Sheikh Ali Cartoon danish muslim strip Rage, commented: "We appreciate the incident in which a Muslim Somali boy attacked the devil who abused our prophet Mohammed and we call Cartoln all Muslims around the world musli, target the people like him. To my surprise I discovered that the cartoons brought on a great number of visitors from the entire world. There is a very important distinction Chrisitan hardcore music be made here between what you perceive strp good behavior Cartoon danish muslim strip a fear keeping you from doing things that you want to do

Jesus and Mo is a British webcomic created by an artist using the pseudonym Mohammed Jones.

  • It's a well-kept secret, but Kurt Westergaard 's famous Mohammed Cartoon was not his first attempt.
  • Kortegaard - : Islam has been ably and thoughtfully critiqued by many historical figures.
  • The U.
  • The newspaper announced that this was an attempt to contribute to the debate about criticism of Islam and self-censorship.

In , 12 Danish cartoonists controversially drew pictures of Muhammad at the urging of Flemming Rose, the culture editor of the Danish weekly Jyllands-Posten. This news story from The Comics Journal April offers a multitude of perspectives — from cartoonists, Danes, Muslims, Danish Muslims — and is being rerun to help supply context for the Charles Hebdo killings.

As a result, the Journal is in the rare position of reporting on events that can scarcely have escaped the attention of anyone on the planet. Readers are accustomed to finding the comics field covered in greater depth by the Journal than by other sources of comics news, especially mainstream media, but for once, we had to ask ourselves what the Journal , lacking a Middle Eastern or European bureau, could add to a story that seemed to have been pursued around the world from every conceivable angle.

Via television, newspapers, magazines, radio and the Internet, the publication of the cartoons and the wrath of offended Muslims were reported, the economies, cultural attitudes and immigration policies of Denmark, France and Europe in general were explored, the religious doctrine and history of Islam were explained and debated, Danes were profiled, Muslims were analyzed, and opinions were expressed, ranging from the need for calm and patience to the need for righteous execution and dismemberment.

It was a story that could not help but perpetuate itself. Since the event was essentially a figment of the media to begin with, born in the pages of a newspaper, its very coverage — each new fair-use publication of the cartoons — engendered new stories, like aftershocks that spread and then rebounded upon themselves.

But even that omission became news of a sort, evidence of a betrayal of free speech by those reticent papers and their host countries. Ultimately, the story was like an out-of-control fire that only reached its limits when it was brought up against an even larger fire as extremist Muslim factions turned their rage on other Muslims in Iraq in a series of violent sectarian attacks.

The cartoons were finally displaced from headlines by events that threatened to explode into a civil war in Iraq. By that time, it seems safe to say that literally thousands of stories had appeared in the various media about those 12 Danish editorial cartoons and their repercussions.

By and large, though, these stories tended to focus on updates of the latest riot or the latest public statement by a world figure, and when there was no news to cover, then a particular piece of tangential turf was staked out: How has Muhammad been depicted through the ages? What are Danish attitudes toward Arab immigrants? What does the local Imam think about it all? Coverage in the Middle East seemed to see the Danish cartoons as Western provocation, an insult on top of a history of injuries to the nation of Islam, and debate centered on whether to defend Muslim pride by violent or nonviolent means.

In the West, there was disagreement over whether publication of the cartoons was an appropriate use or an inappropriate abuse of the principle of free speech, but, in its simplest formulation the conflict, as represented in the West, boiled down to one of free speech however misguided versus violence and religious censorship.

In considering what the Journal could add to such a massive media response, we realized that the one thing the Journal had that the other reports lacked was time and the perspective that comes with time.

As much as we each have been bombarded by the Danish cartoons story, we have inevitably been exposed to it in fragments. What the Journal has tried to do is assemble an overview and synthesis of the events of the story, as well as the many ways of looking at what it all means.

Now that events directly related to the cartoons seem to have wound down, we can chart the arc of events that led up to and followed publication of the cartoons. We have also searched far and wide to collect in one place a range of voices interpreting and commenting from various perspectives on the cartoons and their aftermath. Finally, we have considered what these events have to tell us about the power of cartooning to capture and convey convictions and ideas, whether benign or dangerous.

Twelve pictures — 12, words. Though the story exploded in the media and in the streets early this year, it actually originated back in September when Flemming Rose, the culture editor of the Danish weekly Jyllands-Posten , concluded that publishers were self-censoring themselves by observing Muslim religious taboos as to what can be shown and what cannot. Muslim prohibitions against idolatry have been interpreted by some to forbid the rendering of any image meant to represent the prophet.

Rose issued a challenge to 40 artists in Denmark to draw a cartoon featuring Muhammad. A total of 12 of them responded with a mix of lighthearted sketches and satirical comment. In the Feb. His Japanese and Italian translators were stabbed, the former, fatally; and his Norwegian publisher shot.

And then there was the murder a year or so ago of the Dutch filmmaker Theo van Gogh, killed by an Islamic fundamentalist for harshly criticizing fundamentalism. Some of the cartoons turned out to be caricatures because this is just in the Danish tradition. This was not directed at Muslims. I wanted to put this issue of self-censorship on the agenda and have a debate about it. The traditions of Islam prohibit artistic representations of any of the prophets — whether Muhammad, Jesus, Moses or Abraham.

In some of the strictest branches of Islam, not even the human form can be depicted. Since the aim is to prevent idolatry, however, it would seem to be a prohibition directed specifically at good Muslims. Muhammad has appeared through the centuries in hundreds of paintings, drawings and other imagery both in the West and in Islamic countries without a word of complaint in the Muslim world.

In any case, idolatry can scarcely be an issue in the case of the Danish cartoons, which are far from idolizing their subject. It is in fact the very irreverence of the images that clearly accounts for much of the anger expressed by Muslims. From a certain perspective not entirely unfamiliar even in our own country, comics and cartoons have traditionally been considered comical and instruments of ridicule.

Beyond the generic defamation that being the subject of a cartoon might entail, some of the cartoons carried a satirical bite. Some of them played off the violence lately committed in the name of Islam. One shows Muhammad wearing a turban shaped like a bomb with its fuse smoldering. We have run out of virgins! One location where all 12 cartoons can be found.

Unflattering portrayals, no question, but hardly the first time unflattering pictures of the prophet have appeared in the West.

Nor was there much outrage expressed initially to the Danish cartoons. At first, apparently the only objections to the cartoons came from the Danish Muslim community shortly after the publication of the 12 cartoons on Sept. A peaceful demonstration involving 3, Muslims took place Oct. The protesters, reacting to what they saw as a xenophobic, if not racist, expression of discomfort with the Muslim population in Denmark and a public equation of the Muslim religion with acts of terrorism, demanded an apology.

The paper rebuffed the demand. Three days later in Egypt, the Cairo weekly newspaper Al Fagr published the cartoons, and three Egyptian magazines did the same — all to little effect, apparently. Our right to say, write, photograph and draw what we want to within the framework of the law exists and must endure — unconditionally!

Satire is accepted in this country, and you can make caricatures. The prime minister, while resolutely defending the independence of the Danish press, explained to the Muslim ambassadors that they were not without recourse.

The embassies evidently applied to the courts on Nov. By then, the Danish cartoonists were in hiding, having received death threats, and the Danish prime minister had introduced a bill to stiffen penalties for those convicted of threatening and harassing people who, in the exercise of their legal rights, make statements about such topics as religion.

On Nov. The dossier contained the original 12 cartoons. But at least three other images had been added. A third cartoon showed a dog raping a praying Muslim. Some pointed to this misrepresentation as evidence of a cynical conspiracy to foment outrage in the Muslim community. But it might also have been an honest mistake, since the additional images were included in the dossier because they had allegedly been sent to Muslims who had complained publicly about the original 12 in Jyllands-Posten.

The strategy was highly effective, at least in the Middle East. Following a regular Dec. The summit, according to Hassan M. In the first weeks of January, 2. It was an ideal venue for the rumbles of discontent over the cartoons to spread. By mid-January, Muslim anger had turned to fury and erupted, widespread and vicious. Protesters in the Arab streets were calling for beheadings and attracting the attention of television news cameras.

In response to the protests, a small Norwegian evangelical magazine called Magazinet reprinted the cartoons Jan. Meanwhile in Denmark, a Jan. In Beirut on Sunday, Feb. The leaders of the mob turned to the angry young men beside them and told them it was time to leave. Obediently, the crowd thinned out and began walking back to the buses. Perhaps shaken by the magnitude of the backlash, Jyllands-Posten editors met with a moderate Muslim group in mid-January seeking a way to make peace.

The Jan. This can happen with an apology, but it can also happen in some other way. We will leave it to Jyllands-Posten to come up with some ideas. We agreed that we need to find a solution. On the same day, Jyllands-Posten apologized on its website for any offense given to Muslims but stopped short of disavowing its decision to print the cartoons in the first place.

In any case, round two was already heating up, as newspapers in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland expressed solidarity with Jyllands-Posten by reprinting the cartoons Feb. Norway closed its mission to the West Bank Feb. Frank Streicher facetiously summed up events as of Feb.

In the end, all three of them get torched. There was a fresh outbreak of demonstrations in several European cities Feb. On Feb. That same day, the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo ran all 12 Danish cartoons and added several of its own, after a legal attempt by French Muslim organizations to block publication was rejected by a Paris court. By Feb. Quoted in Le Monde Feb. Editor Amanda Bennett said good journalism required them to publish, because, as the controversy persisted, people needed to know what the fuss was all about.

She compared it to decisions in the past to publish photographs of the bodies of burned Americans hung from a bridge in Iraq and to the photograph of an artwork by Andres Serrano showing a crucifix submerged in a jar of urine.

In Texas, the Austin American-Statesman eventually ran one of the images. And so did the Daily Press in Victorville, Calif. In Algeria, according to the Feb. The editors were arrested Feb. Journalists were also prosecuted for publishing the cartoons in Jordan, Yemen, Syria and Indonesia.

Not so, the U. A Feb.

We have not changed our position. Archived from the original on 22 March A years old Mohammed cartoon: Mohammed asleep while drunk. The second part of the book details how the crisis was orchestrated by a handful of Danish Imams. John Burgess says:.

Cartoon danish muslim strip

Cartoon danish muslim strip

Cartoon danish muslim strip

Cartoon danish muslim strip. Navigation menu

There is a very important distinction to be made here between what you perceive as good behavior and a fear keeping you from doing things that you want to do A good example of this was the illustrator who refused to illustrate a children's book about the life of Mohammed. He is on the record in two interviews saying that he insisted on anonymity because he was afraid.

Christopher Hitchens wrote that it is important to affirm "the right to criticize not merely Islam but religion in general". Ralf Dahrendorf wrote that the violent reaction to the cartoons constituted a sort of counter-enlightenment which must be defended against.

I refuse to argue politely why freedom of expression, reason and humour should be respected". She said that those things are part of a healthy society and that deeply held feelings or beliefs should not be exempt from commentary, and that those offended had the option of ignoring them.

Ashwani K. He said that the cartoons "create a social environment of conflict and intimidation for a community that already feels that its way of life is threatened. I do not see how such tactics incorporate people into the wider public and democratic sphere, as Rose argues. They have the opposite effect: the marginalised feel further marginalised and powerless.

In France, satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was taken to court for publishing the cartoons; it was acquitted of charges that it incited hatred. Michael Neumann wrote, "Western piety has left the West without a leg to stand on in this dispute. It is no good trumpeting rights of free expression, because these rights are now supposed to have nebulous but severe limitations. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Controversy relating to the publication of depictions of Muhammad.

Main article: Timeline of the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Main article: Descriptions of the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons. Main article: Akkari-Laban dossier. Further information: List of newspapers that reprinted Jyllands-Posten's Muhammad cartoons. See also: Timeline of the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Main article: Charlie Hebdo shooting. See also: Opinions on the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy and International reactions to the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy.

See also: Freedom of speech and freedom of the press in Denmark. Main articles: Aniconism in Islam and Depictions of Muhammad. Further information: Opinions on the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Main article: Islam in Denmark. Main articles: Islam in Europe and Multiculturalism.

The neutrality of this section is disputed. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until conditions to do so are met. July Learn how and when to remove this template message. For example, the Report on International Religious Freedom — Denmark gives a figure of about , Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-knowledge.

Archived PDF from the original on 29 October Retrieved 25 November The tip of an Iceberg", Japanese religion. BBC News. Archived from the original on 15 June Retrieved 22 March Provoen og Profeten: Muhammed Krisen bag kulisserne in Danish. Copenhagen: Jyllands-Postens Forlag. Koranen og profeten Muhammeds liv in Danish.

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Muhammad Cartoons

Jesus and Mo is a British webcomic created by an artist using the pseudonym Mohammed Jones. Launched in November , the comic is published on its eponymous website once a week now. The comic is simply drawn, typically using a single image for each face, each of which is duplicated for each panel in the strip.

It features two present-day religious prophets , Jesus and Mo. While Jesus is portrayed as the bona fide Christian Jesus , Mo claims to be a body double , [1] using casuistry to circumvent the Islamic restriction against pictorial depictions of Muhammad.

Jesus and Mo share a flat [2] and a bed , and occasionally venture outside, principally to a public house , The Cock and Bull , where they drink Guinness and engage in conversation and debate with an atheist female bartender known simply as Barmaid, who is never drawn [3] but is characterised only as an out-of-frame speech bubble. The barmaid functions as the voice of reason when criticising the Abrahamic religions or religion in general.

Other times, Jesus or Mo may act as the voice of reason depending on which religion a particular comic aims to criticise. Jesus will act as the author's mouthpiece if the comic aims to criticise Islam while the character Mo will be used to criticise Christianity. They also converse with each other on a park bench. The Abrahamic prophet Moses appears in some cartoons. The Hindu deity Ganesh made a one-time appearance; both Jesus and Mo mocked his depicted weight and four arms.

Joseph Smith , the founder of Mormonism, has also appeared: his face hidden by a hat, a reference to Smith supposedly reading seeing stones by putting them inside a stovepipe hat and sticking his face inside.

In the comic for 24 September , the author used animation blinking eyes in the final panel. The comic consists mainly of religious satire , often criticising arguments for religion, [7] religious texts [8] and decrees [9] and the actions of believers. Episodes from Jesus and Mo have been published in paperback.

Strips 1—50 are published in Vol 1 "Where's the soap? Vol 3 "Things Not Seen" contains strips —, as well as 10 previously unreleased strips. All print copies are published by Lulu. The strip is published sporadically in the British magazine The Freethinker.

Three strips were printed in the Danish newspaper Information [12] and one in their online version on On the programme, the production team stopped participants from being shown wearing T-shirts with the cartoon, which depicted Jesus saying "Hey" and "Mo" saying "How ya doing?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jesus and Mo A sample of the comic Jesus and Mo originally published in November , featuring all four of the recurring characters. Retrieved 28 October Archived from the original on 29 October Daily Times Pakistan. Archived from the original on 5 January The government has blocked all websites that carry caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad Xeni Jardin 20 March Boing Boing.

The government has blocked all websites that carry caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad Jesus and Mo Peter Nielsen 20 March Dagbladet Information.

Archived from the original on 9 August Julian Baggini The Philosophers' Magazine Issue 36, page 7. Retrieved 11 October Michael Cavna 6 January The Washington Post Comic Riffs. Retrieved 14 October Michael Cavna 21 January Retrieved 21 January The twice-weekly cartoon by the pseudonymous Mohammed Jones won both the Best Comic and Best Webcomic categories in our nonbinding reader poll.

Archived from the original on 19 September Retrieved 23 September Archived from the original on 21 December Retrieved 11 December Archived from the original on 8 October Retrieved 6 October The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 4 March Archived from the original on 10 January Retrieved 10 January Categories : British webcomics Creative Commons-licensed comics webcomic debuts s webcomics.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. A sample of the comic Jesus and Mo originally published in November , featuring all four of the recurring characters.

Cartoon danish muslim strip