Naked sleeping bag-Is Sleeping Naked Really Warmer? • Columbia Blog

Sleeping bags are designed to offer users comfort and warmth. They are popular with campers as they are easy to carry and a provide a simple solution to sleeping well when camping out. There are many myths surrounding what you should wear in your sleeping bag. Some people state that sleeping naked in a sleeping bag is the way to go, while others prefer to wear some clothes. We thought we would take a look and come up with facts on whether sleeping naked in a sleeping bag was warmer or not….

Naked sleeping bag

The age-old debate that causes arguments from the riverside campsite to the highest peaks. And all this bxg mean you have to put your clothes in your backpack. I don't really know if it's dependent upon the type of bag you're in or what, but I have 0 doubt that it worked much better for me personally. Share I think I know a better option… Why people believe layering up is the key On the other Naked sleeping bag of the fence are the fans of layering up. The sleeping bag and our clothing gets compressed under the body causing rapid heat loss to a colder Naked sleeping bag via conduction. Some people state Vintage biplane barnstormer minnesota sleeping naked in a sleeping bag is the way to go, while others prefer to wear some clothes. Never tried during a heavy storm, though.

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At one time or another you may have been told that by sleeping naked in your sleeping bag, you will stay warmer at night.

  • Sleeping bags are designed to trap the heat your body produces and prevent it from escaping.
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The age-old debate that causes arguments from the riverside campsite to the highest peaks. However, in short:. Sleeping bags are designed to work by trapping warm air that your body has heated up. This provides an insulative layer between your skin and the colder outside air. Wearing correctly fitting clothes creates additional insulative layers.

This increases the total amount of insulation thus keeping you warmer than if you were naked. How to layer up correctly and how to stay warm in your sleeping bag also below. From research and my own understanding, some believe that sleeping naked is warmer because the body presents a larger surface area to the sleeping bag.

The large surface area allows your body heat to effectively heat the trapped air inside the bag and keep you toasty all night long. No one can argue with the theory of warming trapped air close to the body to keep us warm.

This is how animals fur keeps them warm, thermos flasks stay hot and even how surfers stay happy in their wetsuits. However, sleeping bags are not perfectly sealed around our bodies, there are ways for that lovely warmed air to escape. Additionally, the relatively large pocket of air between body and bag can be difficult to heat fully.

The amount of insulation must be increased. I think I know a better option…. On the other side of the fence are the fans of layering up. They think that putting on some clothes before getting in the bag keeps them warmer through the night. The reasoning here being that wearing an additional layer close to the skin creates an extra insulative layer.

Do you wear a wicking base-layer, micro-fleece and outer down jacket, or do you get naked and wear only the down jacket? I think I know what is going to keep me warmer. Layering correctly also makes it easy to regulate your temperature in your sleeping bag. Just like layering up to trek outside, wear a high-quality wicking material next to your skin.

So, wearing an extra layer or two will keep you warmer than being naked. Wear correctly fitting base-layers — Ensure layers are not too tight and not too loose. If your clothes are too tight, it may reduce circulation to extremities causing cold hands and feet at the least. Zipped designs are best to keep your neck warm or to let out heat when roasty. Similarly, the Rab Merino Pants work wonderfully well. This style is looser and comfier than compression type base-layers.

Use a lightweight and breathable microfleece to add that next layer of insulation. This can be worn and removed as appropriate to regulate your temperature through the night. Go for soft and stretchy like the Rab Nexus Midlayer. For those who get really cold, you may want to use a thicker midlayer. I suggest the Berghaus Activity Polartec Fleece or similar. Simply taking your jacket off and getting into your sleeping bag is not the best way to do business.

Make sure you change into your dry base and midlayers after a long day. Consider these your adventure pyjamas. Wear socks and a hat — Huge amounts of body heat is lost via the head, if you are cold, make sure you have a something dry to wrap around that skull.

Additionally, a dry pair of breathable socks will increase the comfort and warmth levels that little bit further. Avoid wearing mammoth-like thick socks that will have your feet sweating and void of air. I was taught in the military to make sure air can get to your feet to help with blisters and sore spots. Space save — Put your day clothes in the bottom of your sleeping bag.

This reduces the amount of space thus air in the sleeping bag. Overdressing — Wearing too many clothes will restrict your movement in the bag making for a less comfortable sleep. Additionally, tight clothes may restrict circulation which will leave cold hands and feet.

Sweating — Wear as little as possible to remain warm. Lots of layers may seem great initially, but some hours later you will be sweat. The moisture will make you cold and undo any benefit from the clothes in the first place. There are three main factors here, insulate from the outside with a quality sleeping bag, layer up correctly inside your bag and insulate from the ground by using a decent sleeping pad.

However, for cold conditions, use only high-end synthetic or down bags with high R-Values to stay warm. I would suggest the Rab Ascent or something of the same ilk in this situation. Use a sleeping bag liner — Quick and easy.

A nice lightweight addition to your sleeping bag which will add another layer of warmth. Use a decent sleeping pad — The quickest way to get cold in a sleeping bag is via the ground. The sleeping bag and our clothing gets compressed under the body causing rapid heat loss to a colder surface via conduction. Make sure to use good insulating sleeping pad with multiple cells like the Thermarest NeoAir XTherm to keep yourself warm.

Make sure to get a high-quality sleeping bag that is suitable for the camping conditions. Wear suitably fitting, wicking base and midlayers. Finally, use a decent sleeping pad to insulate yourself from the floor and you will be sleeping like a baby no matter the weather. Skip to content. However, in short: Sleeping bags are designed to work by trapping warm air that your body has heated up.

First, the birthday suit purists… Why people think sleeping naked is warmer From research and my own understanding, some believe that sleeping naked is warmer because the body presents a larger surface area to the sleeping bag. So, what can be done about this? I think I know a better option… Why people believe layering up is the key On the other side of the fence are the fans of layering up.

I have to say; I agree with this both in theory and in practice. How to layer up correctly for maximum warmth Stay warm all night by paying attention to the following: Wear correctly fitting base-layers — Ensure layers are not too tight and not too loose. Things to avoid when layering up Overdressing — Wearing too many clothes will restrict your movement in the bag making for a less comfortable sleep. How to be warm in a sleeping bag There are three main factors here, insulate from the outside with a quality sleeping bag, layer up correctly inside your bag and insulate from the ground by using a decent sleeping pad.

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But I wanted it to take a different direction, I was too wound up tonight, rolling over on my back she now had better access to it. At first I was about to push her away but the feeling of warmth from her was a little too enticing. Related Mom was happy to sit back and look at the reading material conveniently placed around the living room. It only takes a minute to sign up. Asked 7 years, 8 months ago.

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag. Upload successful

The amount of heat your body produces during the night changes, to a large extent based on how recently you ate food. So if you wake up cold at night, eat something sweet and fatty like a candy bar without caffeine or some nuts.

Sleeping warm is a skill. I agree. If you think it works, why do you wear layers under your down jacket? Layering to keep warm is the same no matter how you apply it. This fallacy is especially obvious when you have to get up in the morning to get dressed, naked is COLD!

When I was 15 I slept nearly nights in a row in my backyard. I experimented sleeping nearly naked and with clothes. It was hard for me to know what the temps got down to in the night and if it made a difference or not.

I am an architect and I understand the house being your sleeping bag and if you wear extra clothes you will be warmer. I was warm! Forget naked!

Thermodynamics overrules nakedness…. The analogy of a house is BS. Sleeping naked or nearly naked is taught to prevent the excessive use of clothing preventing the body heat from warming the relatively small confines of a sleeping bag. The house analogy Is wrong because a house has too much volume compared the to designed hvac not to mention other means of heat loss.

And experienced folks leave their clothes for the next day in the bottom of their bag so they to are warm in the morning. Your email address will not be published. How Sleeping Bags Work Sleeping bags are designed to trap the heat your body produces and prevent it from escaping.

Exceptions to the Rule There are times when wearing clothing in your sleeping bag will not keep you warmer. You wear such tight-fitting long underwear or socks that it reduces the blood circulation to your extremities and makes them feel colder.

You wear wet clothing which compromises the insulation in your sleeping bag as the heat of your body dries it. So actually it may be a source of that hypothesis - better to sleep without trousers, and sleep on them instead. However, many people claim that it's warmer to sleep naked. Well, the ones I know have very warm and expensive sleeping bags, so the temperatures were above their comfort rage. I have an impression that such rumors are produced by sleeping bag producers, which want people to buy warmer sleeping bags for cold weather, instead of trying to keep them warm in their cheaper summer-time sleeping bags with extra layers of clothing.

Note that sleeping bags are relatively new. As a soldier in 1st World War, you had only a blanket to keep you warm and you had to sleep in everything you have on you during winter. Personally I slept with less layers while in the military and sometimes naked and was warmer than I ever was when I slept with layers on. I don't really know if it's dependent upon the type of bag you're in or what, but I have 0 doubt that it worked much better for me personally.

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The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Is it warmer to sleep naked in a sleeping bag? Ask Question. Asked 7 years, 8 months ago. Active 2 years, 1 month ago. Viewed 39k times. Is that true, or is it better to leave warm clothes on while in the bag? Reverend Gonzo Reverend Gonzo 4, 10 10 gold badges 41 41 silver badges 74 74 bronze badges.

The only people I've ever heard this from are people who've never been camping. It's only warmer if you're not alone Best to construct a 1-person burrito wrap. Should be its own question on here if not already.

Lots of good thoughts - but one thing I know is true: if you are cold and want to warm up, try taking off and putting back on all of your clothes without getting out of your sleeping bag.

Works every time. This seems to have attracted a lot of contradictory answers, none of them containing any solid evidence. This question might be better for skeptics. When talking about fresh, dry clothes then it's not true. There's no paradox. Except for with wool, perhaps. From my understanding, wool will keep you warm when dry or wet.

Clothes insulate body parts from other body parts though, whereas a sleeping bag would not. I have poor circulation in my feet, and wearing socks to bed makes them warm up considerably slower.

Note though that if you manage to make yourself too warm, you sweat, and then your clothes that were dry turn damp. Wet wool is still pretty uncomfortable, it's just not nearly as uncomfortable as wet cotton. I personally would NOT go completely naked but have 1 or 2 layers on. A friend of my parents went on a Himalaya expedition a long time ago. During the night, his friend went on a bathroom trip in the storm.

His friend was never seen again. Never tried during a heavy storm, though. A few seconds in the snow can improve circulation in lower legs significantly. Of course, YMMV as may the outside temprature. My experience tell me this: sleep naked always if there's no sign of a possible avalanche. Also agrees with my experience. I would like to hear the story behind how you got the experience not to sleep naked in avalanche? This doesn't make any sense to me.

Lightweight alpinists are increasingly using sleeping systems which combine clothing and bags to save weight. There is extensive practical experience with this at all altitudes and it works, even on ers.

PHD have a whole section of their site on this: phdesigns. The areas where I might consider it warmer to not wear clothing inside a sleeping bag are: Insufficient ground insulation when sleeping on solid ice or where you have no other viable insulation. This is especially true when the uncompressed side of your sleeping bag is sufficiently lofted but the compressed side is not. Clothes that are wet and will chill you as the water evaporates or interfere with down insulation in the sleeping bag.

And if you share a bag with someone, you get less heat from one another. So you end up with uncomfortably or even painfully cold toes or arms. This leads to worse blood circulation and less heat for peripherial parts of your body. Steed Steed 3, 1 1 gold badge 14 14 silver badges 30 30 bronze badges.

And these are dry clean clothes kept away from any moisture. Snitse Snitse 1 1 silver badge 7 7 bronze badges. Keep the bag Warm not your clothes!

Sleeping Naked in a Sleeping Bag, Warmer or Not?

A few years ago I was camping in the Negev in southern Israel. Since its a desert, there is no surprise that weather changes consistently during day and night.

A few years of experience and some in-depth readings on the matter brought up some answers. It is NOT warmer to sleeping naked in your sleeping bag since clothes provide thermal insulation by trapping warm air close to your body. Sleeping with damp clothing or with too many layers might mislead into thinking that I am wrong — I will elaborate on the topic later on. To convince you that sleeping with clothes on is warmer than naked, I will try the scientific approach. The physics behind it talks about particle collisions, including electrons within atoms.

I will try to keep it simple — thermal conduction is merely the process of heat transfer from a hot material to a colder one. Within your sleeping bag — the high-temperature object is your own body, and the cold one is the environment outside the bag. In this process, heat goes off your body through the air, which acts as a conductive. If you can trap the temperature within the conductive, you will be able to maintain heat.

Well, that is precisely what sleeping bags do — their insulation contains small air-pocket which trap the air from moving forward. For that, in some cases, sleeping with clothes on may seem colder than with clothes off. Instead of cheap clothes, you better keep yourself warm with some cotton or down-filled clothing. Regarding sleeping bags and thermal techniques; there is no doubt they are among the best.

Use the warmth of your down clothing to sleep in and you can really cut down the weight and bulk of your main bag. The guys from PHD emphasize that sleeping with clothes on increases warmth while maintaining lightweight carry since you merely sleep in your hiking clothing.

With over three million subscribers, there is no question these guys are trustworthy. He says that the first two steps to keep you warm is zipping your sleeping bag all the way and to get yourself a proper sleeping pad for ground isolation.

Besides that, he mentions that his recommendation is to sleep with a long top and bottom cotton underwear to keep you warm. So what is the first thing we all do in this situation? Well, of course, we immediately wear a pair of socks. The reasons socks keep your feet warm better than sleeping bags is because socks wrap around your feet from all sides. In opposed to that, sleeping bags usually feature a gap between your feet and the inner walls. Some believe that socks do poorly concerning thermal conduction since they block blood flow to the periphery.

I believe that many people think that it is better to sleep naked in a sleeping bag since they had a bad experience with clothes. Nevertheless, I do suggest you take some means to avoid confounders. The first I will be talking about is night sweats. The reason you tend to sweat with clothes on proves my point, although it could also be the reason why you are getting cold during your sleep. That is another perfect example in which clothes get you warmer — however in an exaggerated, ambiguous way.

Hiking in lousy weather conditions gets your clothes wet no matter how hard you are trying to avoid it. If you get in your sleeping bag wet — you are going to get cold during nighttime. Not necessarily. I believe that there are two main reasons for that. First, getting yourself too warm eventually make you sweat and once you do — you soak your sleeping bag and get cold. Second, you should keep in mind that the source for the warmth is your own body.

Nevertheless, my experience taught me that there are some cases in which sleeping naked is also okay. I would let myself sleep with clothes off once the sleeping bag is high-quality and down-filled, for example.

Beside the two, I also find sleeping naked essential when sleeping on solid ice. In this scenario, cold gets through mainly from the bottom, so sleeping ON your clothing is better than IN them. Another familiar debate is about the best type of sleeping bags, regarding down-filled versus synthetic ones.

From personal experience, the combination of a down-filled sleeping bag and a cotton liner works best even with clothes off. The long-lasting debate regarding sleeping with clothes on or off in a sleeping bag is because nights could get cold when camping.

One guy said that after he woke up due to cold, he got out of his sleeping bag and took all the clothes off. Then, got in it again and fell asleep again, this time feeling warm and comfy. Also, during some parts of our sleep, the breathing slows down. When we breathe we exhale water and lose HEAT, so when we breathe slower — temperature drops less, and we maintain warmer. Combine the dropping temperature with a slower breath, and you get why this guy felt better after taking his clothes off. Once you wake up, it takes time for your body to get into awakening physiological status.

There is a good chance that his body was still demanding lower temperatures as it did while sleeping. It is warmer to sleep with clothes on, however, to get sufficient insulation you should make sure you do it right. The physics behind that is leaning on thermal conduction, which is the heat transfer from a hot object to a colder one. Instead of wearing too many layers, you can get yourself warmer during nighttime by building a campfire which would burn all-night long.

This way you lower the chances that your sleeping bag soak sweat which would compromise its insulation capabilities, especially with down-filled ones. There are scenarios in which sleeping naked would still make sense — like when having a high-quality sleeping bag and a sleeping liner.

When sleeping on solid ice — putting clothes underneath would be better than on, although combining the two might work as well. If you have any hesitations or ideas regarding that topic — let me know all about it by leaving a comment below! Skip to content. I was talking to my friend a couple of days ago and told him I plan on getting into rock climbing.

Then, the inevitable question popped up; how much does climbing gear cost? I knew that I needed ropes, helmet, carabiners, harness, and so on. Nevertheless, I had no clue what is their price and […]. Continue Reading. As a person who is interested in getting into climbing, I started to wonder what are the dangers of mountaineering and climbing a mountain in particular.

There are a few which immediately popped to my mind, although I felt it was necessary to research a little deeper. After all, once you get familiar with dangers, […].

Naked sleeping bag

Naked sleeping bag