Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores-

This report investigates differences in risk behaviors among men who have sex with men MSM who went to gay bathhouses, public cruising areas, or both. Distinguishing between sex venues previously treated as a single construct revealed a significant association between pattern of venue use and sexual risk. The variety of settings is large, but they generally allow participants to secure a minimum of privacy, at least in terms of not being harassed or interrupted. The general purpose of all these venues is or purports to be something other than providing opportunities for sex. Consequently, MSM who frequent these venues share them with people who are not seeking sexual encounters on the premises, and MSM take certain risks in looking for sexual encounters, including risk of discovery, physical harm, or arrest.

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

However, since we do not know the serostatus of their partners, it may be that HIV-positive men engaged in risky sexual practices with other HIV-positive men. The history of gay bathhouses. Melissa Adelson, Liz Garrity, and Eva Coyle were always willing and able to taerooms whatever administrative support was needed. To control for a major Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores of HIV risk behavior, we included in this analysis usage of 4 drugs that tend to be associated with casual sex: poppers i. Interviews covered a range of Gaj, psychologic, and health-related topics, with an emphasis on HIV-related issues. We are judged solely on Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores we can offer up in a selfie or two. Nad no Ass hall of fame have to turn up in person and show our faces to meet someone; we just select a body part or two and show it in a selfie. Respondents were asked a series of questions related to frequenting specific sex venues in the past 12 months. Boolstores whole affair is so damn respectable. Home News Why the internet is the worst thing ever to happen to gay lib.

Anne klein petite. Subscribe to the VICE newsletter.

Some forbid sex in pools for hygiene reasons. And no, before you ask, Ringo starr no song wasn't worth it. Irish Times. Open in a separate window. Humphreys L. Gonna be hangin-out again this afternoon and evening,and tesrooms for some meat as usual. Visiting a downtown gay bath was in many ways like revisiting a high-school gym — everyone wearing the same towel, in the same color, on the same part of the body. In the last decade, bathhouses, including ones in San Diego, Syracuse, Seattle and San Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores, have shut down and the total nationwide is less than Gilbert, Sky September 21, Abstract It is not uncommon to see pornographic movies playing on wall-mounted televisions throughout the bathhouse. Gay Times.

Photo by Freek Zonderland via Stocksy.

  • Gay bathhouses that once remained in the shadows to stay in business are now seeking attention to keep their doors open.
  • It has 3 projection rooms, the main one is like a regular movie screen, and the other 2 are TVs.

This report investigates differences in risk behaviors among men who have sex with men MSM who went to gay bathhouses, public cruising areas, or both. Distinguishing between sex venues previously treated as a single construct revealed a significant association between pattern of venue use and sexual risk.

The variety of settings is large, but they generally allow participants to secure a minimum of privacy, at least in terms of not being harassed or interrupted.

The general purpose of all these venues is or purports to be something other than providing opportunities for sex. Consequently, MSM who frequent these venues share them with people who are not seeking sexual encounters on the premises, and MSM take certain risks in looking for sexual encounters, including risk of discovery, physical harm, or arrest. These are usually called gay bathhouses or baths , although they go by other names e.

Because the association between HIV and baths was identified early in the epidemic, 5 — 11 investigators have given considerable attention to sex venues generally. Their studies were of 2 types: men leaving a selected venue e. Curiously, none of these studies investigated differences in levels of risk between the different types of sex venues e. Given earlier ethnographic research in sex venues, one might expect sexual behavior across venues to vary.

Using data from a probability sample of urban MSM, the present analysis describes the characteristics of men according to their pattern of sex venue attendance: whether they went only to public cruising areas, only to baths, or to both public cruising areas and baths. Detailed descriptions of the methods for this study are provided elsewhere. We developed sample weights to reflect probability of selection, nonresponse, and noncoverage, while maintaining proportionality between cities based on the estimated size of each city's MSM population.

All data in this report are weighted. Interviews covered a range of social, psychologic, and health-related topics, with an emphasis on HIV-related issues.

HIV status was self-reported. Respondents were asked a series of questions related to frequenting specific sex venues in the past 12 months. To control for a major cofactor of HIV risk behavior, we included in this analysis usage of 4 drugs that tend to be associated with casual sex: poppers i.

Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between attending a sex venue either baths or public cruising areas in the past 12 months and various correlates, including demographic characteristics, HIV status, drug usage, and a gross index of HIV risk behavior. Venue, frequency of venue attendance, and their interaction were entered in the equation first, followed by frequency of drug use and HIV serostatus. In the last step, all other 2-way interactions except the venue-with-drug use interaction, which would have resulted in an empty cell were given the chance to enter the model via a backward stepwise procedure.

Partnered men were less likely to go to these sex venues; nevertheless, a substantial proportion reported attending. The 3 possible pairwise comparisons for venue use cruisers vs bathers, cruisers vs multivenue users, and bathers vs multivenue users were evaluated by employing a Bonferroni solution to limit type I error. The difference between cruisers and multivenue users was near significance. The interaction between pattern of venue use and frequency of venue use was not significant and therefore was not retained in the final model.

None of the other interactions tested achieved statistical significance. Nevertheless, because our measures assessed risk behavior, the data emphasized the minority of men who engaged in risky behavior in these venues. However, since we do not know the serostatus of their partners, it may be that HIV-positive men engaged in risky sexual practices with other HIV-positive men. Baths played a central role in the early spread of HIV, 5 and some have suggested that the bathhouse environment is inherently unsafe.

Comprehensive prevention efforts need to address the individual, the environment, and their interaction. We know that baths are places where prevention efforts can actually find a majority of the men who have risky sex, and they are places where sex occurs, sometimes unprotected sex.

This fact is particularly noteworthy, given that HIV prevention programs have not successfully reached men at highest risk for HIV transmission. Although we know that many US baths distribute condoms, lubrication, and HIV information, and a few provide counselors and special events related to safer-sex skills building, 3 there is no evidence of the efficacy of these interventions. Although the data suggest an interaction between the environment and the individual, they are not sufficient to identify the particular characteristics that contribute to the interaction.

Thus, although prevention programs that address the individual need to continue, the challenge in the next generation of prevention efforts is to unravel the complex interaction between individual characteristics and the environment. Given the recently reported increases in risk behavior 29 and in sexually transmitted diseases among gay men, 30 it is a challenge we cannot ignore. This study would not have been possible without the extensive cooperation of the men who were willing to serve as project participants, the dedication of interviewers who were able to secure participants' cooperation, and the project staff of Survey Methods Group of San Francisco.

Dr Judith Moskowitz's creativity in mapping the cities and seeing the project through the multiple pretests and Dr Thomas Mills's knowledge and expertise in the design and implementation of the initial fieldwork were key contributions to the success of this study. Melissa Adelson, Liz Garrity, and Eva Coyle were always willing and able to provide whatever administrative support was needed.

The procedures for involvement of human participants and their informed consent were reviewed and approved by the Committee for Human Research, University of California San Francisco. Binson helped design the original project and instrument, led in conceiving the original study question, proposed and interpreted the analysis, and wrote the paper. Woods participated in the conception and design of the paper, contributed to the interpretation, wroted sections of the paper, and assisted in revising the paper.

Pollack conducted the analyses, participated in interpretation, and reviewed drafts of the paper. Paul contributed to the original conception of the study and to the design of the data collection instrument, and reviewed drafts of the paper. Stall, as coprincipal investigator, designed the original project and reviewed drafts of the paper.

Catania, as principal investigator, designed the original project, designed the instrument, and reviewed drafts of the paper. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Am J Public Health. Catania , PhD. Find articles by Diane Binson. William J. Find articles by William J. Find articles by Lance Pollack. Find articles by Jay Paul. Find articles by Ron Stall. Joseph A. Find articles by Joseph A. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer.

Accepted November 6, This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Objectives. Measures Interviews covered a range of social, psychologic, and health-related topics, with an emphasis on HIV-related issues.

Open in a separate window. Notes D. Peer Reviewed. References 1. Humphreys L. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter; Chauncey G. Berube A. The history of gay bathhouses. Policing Public Sex. Boston, Mass: South End Press; — Bayer R. Public Health Rep. Martin JL. AIDS risk reduction recommendations and sexual behavior patterns among gay men: a multifactorial categorical approach to assessing change.

Health Educ Q. Homosexual encounters in different venues. AIDS Care. Gay baths and the social organization of impersonal sex. Soc Problems. Styles J. Urban Life. Delph EW. Beverly Hills, Calif: Sage; Rumaker M. A Day and a Night at the Baths.

Brodsky JI. The Mineshaft: a retrospective ethnography. The continuing HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men. Use of antiretroviral therapies among HIV-infected men who have sex with men: a household-based sample of 4 major American cities. Sampling men who have sex with men: strategies for a telephone survey in urban areas in the United States. Proc Am Stat Assoc.

Kalton G. Sampling considerations in research on HIV risk and illness. Blair J. A probability sample of gay urban males: the use of two-phase adaptive sampling. J Sex Res.

The customer undresses, storing his clothing in the locker provided, and is then free to wander throughout the public areas of the bathhouse, which typically include the amenities of a traditional bathhouse or steambath Picture from the movie Hamam. But the need for public places to wash up declined and by the s and '60s, bathhouses largely had become rendezvous spots for gays, prompting occasional raids because sodomy was still criminalized. Bathhouses sometimes display the rainbow flag , which is commonly flown by businesses to identify themselves as gay-run or gay-friendly. Chicago and Manhattan each had about 20 public bathhouses. Levin, Rick June 21, Retrieved 22 December Others tout upscale amenities like plush towels and marble baths.

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores. Navigation menu

In the last decade, bathhouses, including ones in San Diego, Syracuse, Seattle and San Antonio, have shut down and the total nationwide is less than Owner Peter D.

Sykes said fewer customers and rising rent put an end to four decades in business. Bathhouses date to the Roman Empire. In the 19th and early 20th Centuries, American bathhouses were built in many cities to maintain public hygiene among poor and immigrant communities.

Chicago and Manhattan each had about 20 public bathhouses. Privately run, gay-owned bathhouses proliferated in the s, offering a haven for gay and bisexual men to meet. Each venue was operated like a speakeasy: a nondescript building often located in the urban fringe.

In-house entertainment was common, from DJs to live performers. Amid the AIDS epidemic in the early s, bathhouses were vilified for enabling promiscuity and helping spread the disease, and many either closed voluntarily or by legal pressure.

Those that remained were stigmatized, and now many younger gays see them as anachronisms. NABA formed two years ago for bathhouse owners to pool best practices for marketing and operations. Consequently, MSM who frequent these venues share them with people who are not seeking sexual encounters on the premises, and MSM take certain risks in looking for sexual encounters, including risk of discovery, physical harm, or arrest.

These are usually called gay bathhouses or baths , although they go by other names e. Because the association between HIV and baths was identified early in the epidemic, 5 — 11 investigators have given considerable attention to sex venues generally. Their studies were of 2 types: men leaving a selected venue e. Curiously, none of these studies investigated differences in levels of risk between the different types of sex venues e.

Given earlier ethnographic research in sex venues, one might expect sexual behavior across venues to vary. Using data from a probability sample of urban MSM, the present analysis describes the characteristics of men according to their pattern of sex venue attendance: whether they went only to public cruising areas, only to baths, or to both public cruising areas and baths.

Detailed descriptions of the methods for this study are provided elsewhere. We developed sample weights to reflect probability of selection, nonresponse, and noncoverage, while maintaining proportionality between cities based on the estimated size of each city's MSM population. All data in this report are weighted. Interviews covered a range of social, psychologic, and health-related topics, with an emphasis on HIV-related issues.

HIV status was self-reported. Respondents were asked a series of questions related to frequenting specific sex venues in the past 12 months. To control for a major cofactor of HIV risk behavior, we included in this analysis usage of 4 drugs that tend to be associated with casual sex: poppers i. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the association between attending a sex venue either baths or public cruising areas in the past 12 months and various correlates, including demographic characteristics, HIV status, drug usage, and a gross index of HIV risk behavior.

Venue, frequency of venue attendance, and their interaction were entered in the equation first, followed by frequency of drug use and HIV serostatus. In the last step, all other 2-way interactions except the venue-with-drug use interaction, which would have resulted in an empty cell were given the chance to enter the model via a backward stepwise procedure. Partnered men were less likely to go to these sex venues; nevertheless, a substantial proportion reported attending.

The 3 possible pairwise comparisons for venue use cruisers vs bathers, cruisers vs multivenue users, and bathers vs multivenue users were evaluated by employing a Bonferroni solution to limit type I error. The difference between cruisers and multivenue users was near significance. The interaction between pattern of venue use and frequency of venue use was not significant and therefore was not retained in the final model. None of the other interactions tested achieved statistical significance.

Nevertheless, because our measures assessed risk behavior, the data emphasized the minority of men who engaged in risky behavior in these venues. However, since we do not know the serostatus of their partners, it may be that HIV-positive men engaged in risky sexual practices with other HIV-positive men. Baths played a central role in the early spread of HIV, 5 and some have suggested that the bathhouse environment is inherently unsafe.

Comprehensive prevention efforts need to address the individual, the environment, and their interaction. We know that baths are places where prevention efforts can actually find a majority of the men who have risky sex, and they are places where sex occurs, sometimes unprotected sex.

This fact is particularly noteworthy, given that HIV prevention programs have not successfully reached men at highest risk for HIV transmission. Although we know that many US baths distribute condoms, lubrication, and HIV information, and a few provide counselors and special events related to safer-sex skills building, 3 there is no evidence of the efficacy of these interventions.

Although the data suggest an interaction between the environment and the individual, they are not sufficient to identify the particular characteristics that contribute to the interaction. Thus, although prevention programs that address the individual need to continue, the challenge in the next generation of prevention efforts is to unravel the complex interaction between individual characteristics and the environment.

Given the recently reported increases in risk behavior 29 and in sexually transmitted diseases among gay men, 30 it is a challenge we cannot ignore. This study would not have been possible without the extensive cooperation of the men who were willing to serve as project participants, the dedication of interviewers who were able to secure participants' cooperation, and the project staff of Survey Methods Group of San Francisco.

Dr Judith Moskowitz's creativity in mapping the cities and seeing the project through the multiple pretests and Dr Thomas Mills's knowledge and expertise in the design and implementation of the initial fieldwork were key contributions to the success of this study.

Melissa Adelson, Liz Garrity, and Eva Coyle were always willing and able to provide whatever administrative support was needed. The procedures for involvement of human participants and their informed consent were reviewed and approved by the Committee for Human Research, University of California San Francisco. Binson helped design the original project and instrument, led in conceiving the original study question, proposed and interpreted the analysis, and wrote the paper.

Woods participated in the conception and design of the paper, contributed to the interpretation, wroted sections of the paper, and assisted in revising the paper. Pollack conducted the analyses, participated in interpretation, and reviewed drafts of the paper.

Paul contributed to the original conception of the study and to the design of the data collection instrument, and reviewed drafts of the paper. Stall, as coprincipal investigator, designed the original project and reviewed drafts of the paper. Catania, as principal investigator, designed the original project, designed the instrument, and reviewed drafts of the paper. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U.

Am J Public Health. Catania , PhD. Find articles by Diane Binson. William J. Find articles by William J. Find articles by Lance Pollack. Find articles by Jay Paul.

Find articles by Ron Stall. Joseph A. Find articles by Joseph A. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Accepted November 6,

Photo by Freek Zonderland via Stocksy. To ensure the publicly horny aren't caught in a sting by law enforcement—who have historically played the part of affable co-masturbator, until they arrest you for solicitation—users were and still are encouraged to report any suspicious behavior to the site itself as a "heads up. The paradox of the site—that the publicness that made it so appealing also put its users at risk—was not lost on founder Keith "Cruisemaster" Griffith, who penned feature stories about how to avoid arrest.

But it wasn't just cops that users had to fear; by , Cruising for Sex was scoring , hits a day, and journalists began trolling the site, hoping to exploit the general public's fears of gay men by catching dudes mid-blowjob. Nightly news programs installed secret cameras in bathrooms to prove that God-fearing citizens' worst fears were actually true: Gays were fucking in the bushes near their children's playgrounds.

Could you or your child be an innocent victim of On the Fox Five ten o'clock news, Monday. Conflating those who "find each other outside the home," as Griffith described his site's users, with exhibitionists and deviants was easy for the networks; homophobia was already rampant. The shadows of that life provided a place for a lot of freedom and self-exploration, where you didn't have to identify or explain yourself or be some kind of example.

But Griffith, naturally, didn't see his site's users as outside the norm. To him, exploring yourself outside the stultifying confines of an apartment or house was as natural as the trees that grow around a truck stop. He had a vision of a world where everyone could enjoy public, anonymous, and safe sex. Griffith died from complications of cancer and AIDS in , and the site has since been under the watchful eye of Bob Sienkiewicz.

Despite the site's waning traffic, I was still able to find a few recently updated sex spots near my apartment in West Hollywood—including a urinal at my go-to grocery where I'd once noticed a dude lingering a bit too long. I talked to Sienkiewicz about the hottest spots for hooking up in , why he's still leery of TV journalists, and what today's gays misunderstand about the generation who cruised the country in the 90s.

BROADLY: Are there any trends you can identify in terms of activity on the site—certain cities, states, or countries that are currently seeing a lot of public action? Bob Sienkiewicz: Florida always seems to have lots of activity, from the beginning of the site continuing to today. I get lots of reviews of parks, beaches, adult bookstores, and sex clubs, mainly in Fort Lauderdale. When I visited Central Florida with my first ex a few times in the s, in so many places—in Orlando, the Space Coast, Lakeland, and especially the I-4 rest areas—there always seemed to be someone cruising.

You could just see that look. We didn't see that in the Orlando theme parks, probably because they were simply too busy or we were too busy.

These include not only gay cruising [spots] but also for straight couples who seek action with other men. It's rare that I see posts by or looking for trans men, although there are a few. There have always been a lot of reviews for places in rural and small-town areas.

West Virginia, which Keith had written about years ago, is still quite active. I think that men in small towns, especially those in traditional marriages and families, go to small-town bookstores and public places, or else travel to bathhouses or porn theaters in larger cities—Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Memphis, Dallas—to find what they're looking for. Have any reviews popped up in places you wouldn't expect? I've learned not to be surprised by anything.

Military bases? Shopping center toilets in Guam or Manila? The man who wrote about taking his inch dildo to an adult bookstore and how he wanted to return with his Great Dane? I don't know if people are writing about factual experiences or the "true experiences" they wish they had, but generally you can tell from a pattern of reviews—just as with Yelp or whatever—what the character of a place is like.

I have vague memories of TV reporters using bathroom busts to stoke anti-gay hysteria during television sweeps week. Were you an active user of Cruising for Sex at the time? If so, what was it like to live through that? I had been using Cruising for Sex in the late 90s. I think we all understood that this type of publicity happened for ratings purposes, even before the site.

How you behaved in a park or at a beach—I lived in San Diego County then—really involved having to have discretion and common sense anyhow, regardless of [whether it was] sweeps. This still goes on, although I don't know if it's specifically tied into the old Nielsen ratings periods or if there's some other criteria. See the September 28, review , where TV reporters accompanied sheriff's deputies on a raid on a porn theater.

This particular place has seen repeated raids and publicity, but it's unusual for reporters to be present at a raid. Given that cruising is older than civilization, do you think the site will survive in some form in perpetuity? I don't think we can forecast any site or particular media surviving in perpetuity, but I think this type information will still be created and disseminated and used. Are there any listings that seem political, besides the Vatican?

It hasn't had any reviews since then. I'm surprised no one has, shall we say, embroidered on that one. I've also deliberately kept a few [now-]closed places online on the site as part of documenting gay history. One example is the Bijou Theater in Chicago. Some men had shame, but many of us were often having the time of our lives, being transgressive, making our own rules, or simply breaking them all.

What do you think today's generation of gays misunderstand about the men who risked their lives to have sex in parks and toilet stalls? I'm not sure what the general consensus of younger gay men is, if there is one, but I imagine there might be a sense that the older generations were sort of hiding in shame when we did this.

I'm 54, by the way. I remember Laud Humphrey's writings about the "Tearoom Trade," which was the generation before me. The idea of having a difference between the "private self" and the "public self" seems old-fashioned these days, not just in sexuality but in so many parts of life. People broadcast themselves on social media now and have personal or intimate phone calls in public places, a genuine change from days past.

Some men had shame, but many of us were often having the time of our lives, being transgressive, making our own rules, or simply breaking them all, although not necessarily all of the time. The shadows of that life provided a place for a lot of freedom and self-exploration, a "room of one's own" where you didn't have to identify or explain yourself or be some kind of example.

There were no cameras in every pocket and ceiling, and your acts could be as private as you wanted or on the edge of public display. Jan 14 , pm. Photo by Jake Elko via Stocksy.

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores

Gay parks tearooms bathhouses and bookstores