Old latin names-Classical Latin Origin Names - Behind the Name

Roman mythology is rich with historical, religious, and cultural stories. It is a part and parcel of its indigenous arts and literature. It has innumerable tales revolving around morality, augury, politics, and heroism. The Romans always treat their traditional narratives replete with supernatural elements as historical! Baby names inspired by Roman mythology are climbing the popularity charts.

Old latin names

Old latin names

The name was also borne by four popes. The feminine form of Balbinus, it was the name of the famous Saint Balbina who sacrificed Old latin names life with her father, Katin. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. Bellona was Ol Roman Goddess of war and a companion of Mars. This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name implies Adult nude videos or little king. Ancient Roman culture still manages to excite us and elicits nzmes of a Old latin names and ethereal time. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

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This name was Old latin names by a 4th-century Roman emperor. The feminine form of Renato, this name means "born again. Old Latin surviving in inscriptions is written in various forms of the Etruscan alphabet as it evolved into the Latin alphabet. Latin Background Latin Men underwear function one of the oldest and noblest languages of all, dating as far back as 75 BC. In some cases it may come from the name of English places called Battleso named because they were sites Old latin names battles. It's a Spanish name and it means "brings light. These differences did not necessarily run concurrently with lxtin other and were not universal; that is, c was used for both c and g. Fausta 15 iStock. No inscription can be earlier than the introduction of the Greek alphabet into Italy but none survive from that early date. Namespaces Article Talk.

These names were used in ancient Rome and many parts of the Roman Empire.

  • It is ultimately descended from the Proto-Italic language.
  • This is a list of names in which the origin is Classical Latin.

Ancient Roman culture still manages to excite us and elicits feelings of a mystical and ethereal time. Today, though, only a few buildings, some traditions, and legends remain. And, the remnants of the once opulent empire also include her names. It was the family name of the famed Roman emperor Hadrian. Feminine form of Albinus. The names became popular after Saint Albinus, who was the bishop of Angers in Brittany. The feminine name became famous after Marcus Antonius, who was one of the notable people in Roman history.

The name means eagle in Latin, and it describes the positive attributes of wilderness and courage. Augustus was the title given to the first Roman emperor Octavian for his honesty, wisdom, and greatness.

It was also the name of the famous Roman emperor and philosophical writer, Marcus Aurelius. The feminine form of Balbinus, it was the name of the famous Saint Balbina who sacrificed her life with her father, Quirinus. Saint Caecilia was a martyr, who refused to pay her eternal devotion to the Roman gods. The saint later became known for her love for music.

It was the name of the legendary warrior maiden. It comes from the Latin word Cassius meaning empty. In modern days, the name further became famous as the first name of world-famous boxer Muhammad Ali. The feminine name originates from the Latin word faba meaning beans.

It was the name of the popular Roman general, Quintus Fabius Maximus. It comes from the name Flavius that mean golden haired. If your beautiful daughter possesses yellow hair, you can call her by that name. It comes from the Latin word Hora meaning hour or time. One of the famous bearers of the name is Quintus oratius Flaccus.

It is a common English name, and one of the proud bearers of the name is famous actress Julia Roberts. This is a very popular Roman name for girls and has a Spanish origin. One of the famous bearers of the name was Saint Martina, and she is one of the patron saints of Rome. During the era of Roman Empire, Octavia was the sister of Octavian.

She was married to their political alliance Mark Antony. It was also the family name of Marcus Tullius Cicero, famously known as Cicero, who was an orator, author, and statesman of the 1st century BC. Marcellus is derived from Mars, who is the Roman God of War. It comes from the Latin word Maximus that means great.

It was the name of the famous monk Saint Maximus. The name is taken from the Latin word porcus meaning pig. One of the famous bearers of the name was Roman statesman Marcus Porcius Cato. The name implies prince or little king. If you want to treat your son like a prince, you can call him by this name.

It originates from the Latin name Sabine. The Sabines were the ancient people, who used to reside in modern-day central Italy. One of the popular bearers of the name was Sabine king Titus Tatius. This ancient Roman name for boys has an Italian origin. The name implies heavy, and it became popular after the name of the famed founder of Roman Republic, Lucius unius Brutus. One of the famous bearers of the name was Julius Caesar. Inspired by the name of Roman goddess Juno, it became a popular boyish name.

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As a part of the Indo-European language family, Latin used its own alphabet, which was devised from Etruscan alphabet and gave rise to the Latin script that now forms the basis for the largest number of alphabets of any writing system. This is a list of names in which the origin is Classical Latin. It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce. Dominga 10 iStock. A combination of Isis, the Egyptian goddess of fertilty, and the Greek word for gift, this gorgeous name reminds me of the famous song about acclaimed dancer Isadora Duncan interpreted by our beloved Celia Cruz. This was also the name of several early saints. What I mean is that you can look at the names of your great-grandmothers or your great-aunts, for example, and you'll be surprised at some of the gems you'll find going back in the timeline of your own familiares.

Old latin names

Old latin names. Favourite Baby Names

A definite date is really impossible, since archaic Latin does not terminate abruptly, but continues even down to imperial times. Over the years from to 75 BC, Old Latin evolved from being partially comprehensible by classicists with study to being easily read by scholars.

Old Latin authored works began in the 3rd century BC. These are complete or nearly complete works under their own name surviving as manuscripts copied from other manuscripts in whatever script was current at the time. In addition are fragments of works quoted in other authors. Numerous inscriptions placed by various methods painting, engraving, embossing on their original media survive just as they were except for the ravages of time. Some of these were copied from other inscriptions.

No inscription can be earlier than the introduction of the Greek alphabet into Italy but none survive from that early date. The imprecision of archaeological dating makes it impossible to assign a year to any one inscription, but the earliest survivals are probably from the 6th century BC.

Some texts, however, that survive as fragments in the works of classical authors, had to have been composed earlier than the republic, in the time of the monarchy. These are listed below. Old Latin surviving in inscriptions is written in various forms of the Etruscan alphabet as it evolved into the Latin alphabet. The writing conventions varied by time and place until classical conventions prevailed. The works of authors in manuscript form were copied over into the scripts current in those later times.

The original writing does not survive. Some differences between old and classical Latin were of spelling only; pronunciation is thought to be essentially as in classical Latin: [11]. These differences did not necessarily run concurrently with each other and were not universal; that is, c was used for both c and g.

Old Latin is thought to have had a strong stress on the first syllable of a word until about BC. All syllables other than the first were unstressed and were subjected to greater amounts of phonological weakening. Starting around that year, the Classical Latin stress system began to develop. Old Latin often had different short vowels from Classical Latin, reflecting sound changes that had not yet taken place.

For example, the very early Duenos inscription has the form duenos "good", later found as duonos and still later bonus. Old Latin frequently preserves original PIE thematic case endings -os and -om later -us and -um. This rhotacism had implications for declension: early classical Latin, honos , honoris from honos , honoses ; later Classical by analogy honor , honoris "honor".

There are many unreduced clusters, e. Latin nouns are distinguished by grammatical case , with a termination, or suffix, determining its use in the sentence: subject, predicate, etc. A case for a given word is formed by suffixing a case ending to a part of the word common to all its cases called a stem. Stems are classified by their last letters as vowel or consonant. Consonant stems are the root roots end in consonants. For example, the stem puella- receives a case ending -m to form the accusative case puellam in which the termination -am is evident.

In Classical Latin textbooks the declensions are named from the letter ending the stem or First, Second, etc. A declension may be illustrated by a paradigm , or listing of all the cases of a typical word. This method is less frequently applied to Old Latin, and with less validity.

In contrast to Classical Latin, Old Latin reflects the evolution of the language from an unknown hypothetical ancestor spoken in Latium. The endings are multiple. Their use depends on time and locality. Any paradigm selected would be subject to these constraints and if applied to the language universally would result in false constructs, hypothetical words not attested in the Old Latin corpus.

Nevertheless, the endings are illustrated below by quasi-classical paradigms. The locative was a separate case in Old Latin but gradually became reduced in function, and the locative singular form eventually merged with the genitive singular by regular sound change.

In the plural, the locative was captured by the ablative case in all Italic languages before Old Latin. The 'A-Stem' declension. A nominative case ending of —s in a few masculines indicates the nominative singular case ending may have been originally —s : paricidas for later paricida , but the —s tended to get lost.

In the dative singular the final i is either long [19] or short. In the accusative singular, Latin regularly shortens a vowel before final m. In the ablative singular, —d was regularly lost after a long vowel. The vocative singular had inherited short -a. The locative case would not apply to such a meaning as puella , so Roma, which is singular, and Syracusae, which is plural, have been substituted.

The locative plural has already merged with the —eis form of the ablative. Nouns of this declension are either masculine or neuter. The 'Consonant-Stem' and 'I-Stem' declension. This declension contains nouns that are masculine, feminine, and neuter. The stem ends in the root consonant, except in the special case where it ends in -i i-stem declension. The i-stem, which is a vowel-stem, partially fused with the consonant-stem in the pre-Latin period and went further in Old Latin.

Mixed-stem declensions are partly like consonant-stem and partly like i-stem. Consonant-stem declensions vary slightly depending on which consonant is root-final: stop-, r-, n-, s-, etc. For the consonant declension, in the nominative singular, the -s was affixed directly to the stem consonant, but the combination of the two consonants produced modified nominatives over the Old Latin period. In the ablative singular, the -d was lost after BC. In the locative singular, the earliest form is like the dative but over the period assimilated to the ablative.

The 'U-Stem' declension. In all three persons, the ablative singular ending is identical to the accusative singular. This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen.

The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero Claudius's stepson to power. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus , the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi.

After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert.

The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat.

Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong". This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome. Quintus Fabius Maximus was the Roman general who used delaying tactics to halt the invasion of Hannibal in the 3rd century BC.

It was also occasionally used as a praenomen, or given name. This was the name of several early Christian saints. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. This was the name of a Roman official in the New Testament. Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian.

It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint. It could also refer to a person from Gaul Latin Gallia. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland.

This was the name of several early saints. In Roman legend this was the name of a companion of Aeneas. Saint Hilarius was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Poitiers. This was also the name of a 5th-century pope. The name of the month derives from the name of the Roman god Janus. Saint Januarius, the patron saint of Naples, was a bishop who was beheaded during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century. This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta also known as Livia Drusilla , the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius.

A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author.

The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate. This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America. Saint Laurentinus was a 3rd-century martyr from Carthage.

This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus. Titus Livius, also known as Livy, was a Roman historian who wrote a history of the city of Rome. According to Christian legend Saint Longinus was the name of the Roman soldier who pierced Jesus ' side with a spear, then converted to Christianity and was martyred. The name was also borne by the 3rd-century Greek philosopher Cassius Longinus. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse.

She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe in various spellings.

It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce. This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from Antioch. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca known simply as Seneca , a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian.

The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch. It was also borne by three popes, including the 3rd-century Saint Lucius.

Despite this, the name was not regularly used in the Christian world until after the Renaissance. In Roman legend Lucretia was a maiden who was raped by the son of the king of Rome. This caused a great uproar among the Roman citizens, and the monarchy was overthrown.

This name was also borne by a saint and martyr from Spain. Saint Marcellinus was a pope of the early 4th century who was supposedly martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. This was the name of two popes. It was borne by a few very minor saints. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 18th century.

This was the name of a 5th-century Eastern Roman emperor. It was also borne by a 2nd-century saint: a bishop of Tortona, Italy. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, king of Rome. This was also the name of a pope of the 4th century. This was the name of an early saint.

Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome. This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Maarten or Marten in daily life. Saint Maximinus was a 4th-century bishop of Trier. Saint Maximus was a monk and theologian from Constantinople in the 7th century.

This is the name by which the 1st-century Roman emperor Marcus Cocceius Nerva is commonly known. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.

This was a very rare praenomen. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child. This was the original family name of the emperor Augustus born Gaius Octavius. It was also rarely used as a Roman praenomen, or given name. This was the name of a short-lived 1st-century Roman emperor.

This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome. The family had Samnite roots so the name probably originated from the Oscan language, likely meaning "fifth" a cognate of Latin Quintus. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.

Latin First Names - FamilyEducation

These names were used in ancient Rome and many parts of the Roman Empire. See also about Roman names. Modern Rare Archaic. Related name is is not. User list. This was the family name of the Roman emperor Hadrian. His descendants used it as a cognomen.

It was also used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Furia and Menenia families. This name was borne by the scheming mother of the Roman emperor Nero, who eventually had her killed. This was also the name of a 3rd-century Roman saint who is venerated in Sicily.

This name was borne by a series of consuls of the late Roman Republic. This was the name of a few early saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea. Saint Albinus also called Aubin was a 6th-century bishop of Angers in Brittany.

This is also the official Dutch form of the name, used on birth certificates but commonly rendered Anton or Antoon in daily life. Its etymology is unknown. He was responsible for the Aqua Appia the first Roman aqueduct and the Appian Way a road between Rome and Capua , both of which were named for him.

This was the name of a 3rd-century saint from Byblos. Augustus was the title given to Octavian , the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. In 26 BC the senate officially gave him the name Augustus , and after his death it was used as a title for subsequent emperors. This was also the name of three kings of Poland August in Polish. This was a Roman praenomen, or given name.

Folk etymology connects it to Latin aula "palace". Marcus Aurelius was a 2nd-century Roman emperor and philosophical writer. This was also the name of several early saints. Saint Avilius was a 1st-century patriarch of Alexandria. This was the name of an emperor who briefly reigned over the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century. It was also the name of several saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Vienne. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.

Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' It is probably not related to Latin camillus "a youth employed in religious services". This name was borne by the 16th-century Italian monk Saint Camillus de Lellis.

This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille. This name was borne by several early saints. In modern times, it was the original first name of boxer Muhammad Ali , who was named after his father Cassius Clay, who was himself named after the American abolitionist Cassius Clay This name was bestowed upon Cato the Elder Marcus Porcius Cato , a 2nd-century BC Roman statesman, author and censor, and was subsequently inherited by his descendants, including his great-grandson Cato the Younger Marcus Porcius Cato Uticencis , a politician and philosopher who opposed Julius Caesar.

This was the name of a 2nd-century philosopher who wrote against Christianity. It was also borne by an early saint martyred with Nazarius in Milan.

Marcus Tullius Cicero known simply as Cicero was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament.

As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century. This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius.

He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero Claudius's stepson to power. She managed to escape by swimming across the Tiber, at the same time helping some of the other captives to safety. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus , the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi.

After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.

After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat.

Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong". This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome. Quintus Fabius Maximus was the Roman general who used delaying tactics to halt the invasion of Hannibal in the 3rd century BC.

It was also occasionally used as a praenomen, or given name. This was the name of several early Christian saints. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. This was the name of a Roman official in the New Testament. Flavius was the family name of the 1st-century Roman emperors Vespasian, Titus and Domitian.

It was used as a personal name by several later emperors, notably by Constantine. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint. It could also refer to a person from Gaul Latin Gallia.

This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint, a companion of Saint Columbanus, who later became a hermit in Switzerland. This was the name of several early saints. In Roman legend this was the name of a companion of Aeneas. Saint Hilarius was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Poitiers. This was also the name of a 5th-century pope. The name of the month derives from the name of the Roman god Janus.

Saint Januarius, the patron saint of Naples, was a bishop who was beheaded during the persecutions of Emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century. This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta also known as Livia Drusilla , the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius.

A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.

This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

This was the name of an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament there is some debate about whether the name belongs to a man or a woman. This is also the name of a type of flower, an orchid found in Mexico and Central America. Saint Laurentinus was a 3rd-century martyr from Carthage. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus. Titus Livius, also known as Livy, was a Roman historian who wrote a history of the city of Rome. According to Christian legend Saint Longinus was the name of the Roman soldier who pierced Jesus ' side with a spear, then converted to Christianity and was martyred.

The name was also borne by the 3rd-century Greek philosopher Cassius Longinus. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe in various spellings.

It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce. This name was also borne by a 4th-century saint and martyr from Antioch. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome. Two Etruscan kings of early Rome had this name as well as several prominent later Romans, including Lucius Annaeus Seneca known simply as Seneca , a statesman, philosopher, orator and tragedian. The name is mentioned briefly in the New Testament belonging to a Christian in Antioch.

Old latin names