Scout rope machine-

By clemlaw , November 17, in Cub Scouts. I have fond memories of making rope as a Boy Scout, using a rope making machine that showed up about once a year or so. I recently went to a training and learned that the machine isn't really necessary. They taught us the method shown here:. I tweaked this a little bit for our Tigers and a good time was had by all.

Scout rope machine

Scout rope machine

Scout rope machine

Scout rope machine

Scout rope machine

Leave the strand on the spinner and hook. Posted November 19, What training was this in? Or something totally unrelated to scouting? Support the blog and podcast Scout rope machine a Scoutmastercg. Figure Rope made from man-made fibers plastics comes in varying lengths on spools for ease in dispensing.

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I once knew a guy who told his daughter that she couldn't get her drivers license until she could do the Silhouette intimates 1. Slide on the Planet Gear. I added a single lock washer between one of the Weld Nuts and the Planet Gear. Check and change the oil. After these pieces are cut, you have to drill holes through the handle A and the upright part of the base unit C Sout the three tuning hooks. You can do fancy cutouts if you wish. Spin the head of the spinner in a clockwise rotation. Labels: boyboy scoutscubcub scoutscubmasterhow-toinstructionLeonardo da Vincimachineprojectroperopemakingrpewebelos. Sand off all the sharp edges with a hand sander. Make sure Scout rope machine add gussets to the front of the Winder. Sadly, the greatest skill set parents and our educational system never teach, but should from the beginning, is how to set a goal, create a Svout of action for the goal, strategize, and Scot out the plan to Scout rope machine the goal. Was this in like a Scouting University 1 hour class, Scout rope machine some other scouting course that did alot of different things? Create an account or sign in to comment You machije to be a member in order to leave a comment Create an account Sign up for a new account in our community. Keep that site Scout rope machine.

The following text and diagrams are by Adolph E.

  • This is how you can make a geared rope making machine.
  • Warm Greetings!

By clemlaw , November 17, in Cub Scouts. I have fond memories of making rope as a Boy Scout, using a rope making machine that showed up about once a year or so.

I recently went to a training and learned that the machine isn't really necessary. They taught us the method shown here:. I tweaked this a little bit for our Tigers and a good time was had by all.

I explained to the parents that they never again have to buy from the Big Rope Companies. I didn't want to make a bunch of what this site calls "rope spinners" or what our instructor called a "baton".

And I didn't want a bunch of hyperactive Cub Scouts running around swinging batons. So I just used sticks on each end I actually used pencils. The Tigers just held them tight and turned from both ends.

Surprisingly, I don't think we had a single case of someone letting go of the stick and leaving a tangled mess of string. It worked best to spin it by using one hand to make an "O" around the string, and then using one finger of the other hand to spin the pencil. Rather than "whip" the rope, we just put a piece of masking tape tightly around the end. Rather than use bailing twine, I just used the cheapest string I could find.

It worked very well, and left a lot cleaner looking finished product than bailing twine. The Cub Scouts all wound up with a short piece of rope to take home, and it's simple enough that they can repeat it at home with mom or dad. What training was this in? Was this in like a Scouting University 1 hour class, or some other scouting course that did alot of different things?

Or something totally unrelated to scouting? Keep that site handy. That's good to know that it's part of the Bear requirements. I thumbed through the Tiger electives, and couldn't find one to squeeze it in under. So it's good to know that it will be useful for advancement. Yes, it was a one-hour class at University of Scouting.

They had a rope making machine also, but we all made a piece using the "baton". Ummmm, just to clarify probably unnecessarily, but you never know - The rope making they did as Tigers will not count toward a Bear requirement. They will have to make rope again as a Bear Cub Scout in order for it to count for a Bear achievement.

Don't worry--I haven't started signing off their First Class requirements either, or got them started on their Eagle projects. The Bear book also has an illustration of another improvised rope maker using a bench vise and a hand drill brace.

The nice thing about the simple one in the book is the boys can do it themselves. With supervision, of course, for singeing sp? I'mpretty sure that you all know this- but you know how some folks read stuff and get a meaning that is degrees opposite of what is actually said - so I'm gonna say it for them. You have a choice to earn 12 out of 24 achievemnts.

Making rope is a sub part of completeing that particular achievement. You need to be a member in order to leave a comment. Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy! Already have an account? Sign in here. Cub Scouts Search In. Posted November 17, Rope making is good for hours of fun for all ages. Share this post Link to post Share on other sites. Very Nice! Posted November 18, Oh, yes, I understand.

I just mean that they'll be old pros by the time they're Bears. Nice resource. Thanks for sharing! Posted November 19, Create an account or sign in to comment You need to be a member in order to leave a comment Create an account Sign up for a new account in our community. Register a new account. Sign in Already have an account? Sign In Now. Sign In Sign Up.

Slide on the Planet Gear. Here is a picture of the first finished machine: Finished Rope Machine The rope machine has several components. There are stories of people overcomming bad life situations and turning out successful by themselves. You can use a coping saw to cut out the notches see figures 74 and It is very, extremely rare when that actually happens.

Scout rope machine

Scout rope machine. Description

They had a rope making machine also, but we all made a piece using the "baton". Ummmm, just to clarify probably unnecessarily, but you never know - The rope making they did as Tigers will not count toward a Bear requirement.

They will have to make rope again as a Bear Cub Scout in order for it to count for a Bear achievement. Don't worry--I haven't started signing off their First Class requirements either, or got them started on their Eagle projects. The Bear book also has an illustration of another improvised rope maker using a bench vise and a hand drill brace.

The nice thing about the simple one in the book is the boys can do it themselves. With supervision, of course, for singeing sp? I'mpretty sure that you all know this- but you know how some folks read stuff and get a meaning that is degrees opposite of what is actually said - so I'm gonna say it for them. You have a choice to earn 12 out of 24 achievemnts. Making rope is a sub part of completeing that particular achievement.

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment. Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy! Already have an account? Sign in here. Cub Scouts Search In. Posted November 17, Rope making is good for hours of fun for all ages. Share this post Link to post Share on other sites.

Very Nice! Posted November 18, Oh, yes, I understand. I just mean that they'll be old pros by the time they're Bears. Nice resource. Thanks for sharing! Posted November 19, Create an account or sign in to comment You need to be a member in order to leave a comment Create an account Sign up for a new account in our community.

Making the spinner. Draw the basic shape of the spinner on the wood, following the pattern shown in figure Cut the basic shape with a coping saw. This aids in spinning. The top knob is shaped to prevent the yarns from slipping off.

Glue the handle dowel into the hole. Using the spinner. Loop the binder twine over the stick and then run it back to the head of the spinner. Now hold the spinner in front of you and face the other person. Spin the head of the spinner in a clockwise rotation. A little bit of practice will tell you how tight to spin the strand.

Spinning rope. Leave the strand on the spinner and hook. Grab the strand and loop it over the spinner and also loop it over the hook. Now spin the spinner in a counterclockwise rotation, as was done with the three yarns of binder twine. This is opposite of the way for making the strand.

As you spin, the three stands will twist to form a rope. Only practice will tell you how tight to twist the rope. Then whip both ends of the rope and trim them. Another device that can be used to make rope is fashioned after the ropemaker used on farms during the early s.

With it you can twist the three yarns on each hook into a strand, and the three strands into a rope all at the same time. Make the device. Cut out the pieces. First, cut the handle A to shape as shown in figure Do not drill the holes yet.

Next, cut out pieces B and C. Glue and screw them together to form the base unit see figure Then, cut the separator paddle D to the same shape as the handle see figure Later, notches will be cut in the paddle see figure Mark holes in the handle.

After these pieces are cut, you have to drill holes through the handle A and the upright part of the base unit C for the three tuning hooks.

Now mark the positions of the three holes for the turning hooks. Drill the holes. After marking the positions of the holes, hold the handle up to the upright piece on the base unit C. See figure Make the hooks. These hooks are made from coat hangers. Then make two bends in the end of each wire to form an L-shaped end to fit in the handle.

Now, insert the three turning hooks in the holes in the upright piece C of the base unit. Make the separator paddle.

The separator paddle is used to keep the strands separated while they are twisted into rope. To make the separator paddle, place the handle A on top of the paddle D and mark the position of the three holes on the paddle.

Then cut notches in the edges of the paddle at these locations. You can use a coping saw to cut out the notches see figures 74 and

The following text and diagrams are by Adolph E. Peschke as presented in the printing of the edition of the Pioneering Merit Badge Pamphlet:.

History of Rope Making — Making rope out of plant fibers is still done today in remote parts of the world. In many cases people make their own rope because money is in short supply and the native plants that have the needed fibers are in great abundance. As early as A. The technique can still be used today. Both of these farm machines required the use of binder twine. Farmers soon realized that with the supply of binder twine they had for tying up bales of hay, they could easily make all the rope they needed at home by using a simple geared machine.

These machines worked by turning a handle to twist the strands of binder twine into rope. The ropemaker also used a notched paddle to keep the strands from fouling and to regulate a uniform twist as the rope was forming.

Today you have to search the antiques shops for one, and if you find one, it might cost over a hundred dollars. Then, fast-moving machines were invented to simplify the task.

Rope made from man-made fibers plastics comes in varying lengths on spools for ease in dispensing. It might be a bit impractical for your troop to make all the rope needed for camping or for your pioneering projects, but learning how to make rope will help you understand how yarns and strands are twisted to form rope. The basic process of making rope consists of twisting fibers to form yarns.

Then several yarns are twisted together to form strands. Finally, several strands are twisted to form the rope. Three of these binder twine yarns are twisted to form a single strand. The simple rope spinner shown in figure 71 is a replica of one used sometime around A.

With this spinner and fibers from cactus plants in that area, the Indians were able to make the rope they needed to construct shelters and for many other purposes. Making the spinner. Draw the basic shape of the spinner on the wood, following the pattern shown in figure Cut the basic shape with a coping saw. This aids in spinning. The top knob is shaped to prevent the yarns from slipping off. Glue the handle dowel into the hole. Using the spinner. Loop the binder twine over the stick and then run it back to the head of the spinner.

Now hold the spinner in front of you and face the other person. Spin the head of the spinner in a clockwise rotation. A little bit of practice will tell you how tight to spin the strand.

Spinning rope. Leave the strand on the spinner and hook. Grab the strand and loop it over the spinner and also loop it over the hook. Now spin the spinner in a counterclockwise rotation, as was done with the three yarns of binder twine.

This is opposite of the way for making the strand. As you spin, the three stands will twist to form a rope. Only practice will tell you how tight to twist the rope. Then whip both ends of the rope and trim them.

Another device that can be used to make rope is fashioned after the ropemaker used on farms during the early s. With it you can twist the three yarns on each hook into a strand, and the three strands into a rope all at the same time. Make the device. Cut out the pieces. First, cut the handle A to shape as shown in figure Do not drill the holes yet. Next, cut out pieces B and C. Glue and screw them together to form the base unit see figure Then, cut the separator paddle D to the same shape as the handle see figure Later, notches will be cut in the paddle see figure Mark holes in the handle.

After these pieces are cut, you have to drill holes through the handle A and the upright part of the base unit C for the three tuning hooks. Now mark the positions of the three holes for the turning hooks. Drill the holes. After marking the positions of the holes, hold the handle up to the upright piece on the base unit C.

See figure Make the hooks. These hooks are made from coat hangers. Then make two bends in the end of each wire to form an L-shaped end to fit in the handle. Now, insert the three turning hooks in the holes in the upright piece C of the base unit. Make the separator paddle. The separator paddle is used to keep the strands separated while they are twisted into rope.

To make the separator paddle, place the handle A on top of the paddle D and mark the position of the three holes on the paddle. Then cut notches in the edges of the paddle at these locations. You can use a coping saw to cut out the notches see figures 74 and Make the end hook. This is the final step see figure Use a piece of scrap left over from making the handle. To use the ropemaker, first clamp the base unit to a table or a bench.

Tie one end of the binder twine to one of the three turning hooks on the base unit. Now thread the binder twine to the end hook and back to each of the three turning hooks. As you begin, the Scout with the end hook should pull on his end to keep the slack out of the yarns. Then ask a third Scout to insert the three strands in the notches of the separator paddle. Start near the Scout holding the end hook. As the rope is turned, the Scout holding the separator paddle should move the separator paddle towards the base unit, making sure that the strands do not become fouled.

Start tuning the handle so that the hooks turn in a clockwise rotation. As you turn the handle, the yarns binder twine will begin to form into twisted strands, and these strands will also twist to form into rope. The Scout operating the separator paddle should move it to prevent the strands from fouling. If the separator paddle is moved too fast towards the base unit, it will result ina loosely twisted rope.

Too few turns will produce rope that is loose. Too many turns will produce rope that is twisted too tight and might be hard to use. Peschke as presented in the printing of the edition of the Pioneering Merit Badge Pamphlet: History of Rope Making — Making rope out of plant fibers is still done today in remote parts of the world.

Figure 71 Making the spinner. Figure 72 Spinning rope. Figure 73 Cut out the pieces. Figure 74 — Double Schematic for handle A and separator paddle D. Figure 75 Make the hooks. Figure 76 Now, insert the three turning hooks in the holes in the upright piece C of the base unit.

Figure Post to Cancel.

Scout rope machine